Italian Culture in the Drama of Shakespeare & His Contemporaries : Rewriting, Remaking, Refashioning (Anglo-italian Renaissance Studies)

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Italian Culture in the Drama of Shakespeare & His Contemporaries : Rewriting, Remaking, Refashioning (Anglo-italian Renaissance Studies)

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  • 製本 Hardcover:ハードカバー版/ページ数 286 p.
  • 言語 ENG
  • 商品コード 9780754655046
  • DDC分類 822.33

基本説明

Applying recent developments in new historicism and cultural materialism -along with the new perspectives opened up by the current debate on intertextuality and the construction of the theatrical text- the essays collected here reconsider the pervasive influence of Italian culture, literature, and traditions on early modern English drama.

Full Description


Applying recent developments in new historicism and cultural materialism - along with the new perspectives opened up by the current debate on intertextuality and the construction of the theatrical text - the essays collected here reconsider the pervasive influence of Italian culture, literature, and traditions on early modern English drama. The volume focuses strongly on Shakespeare but also includes contributions on Marston, Middleton, Ford, Brome, Aretino, and other early modern dramatists. The pervasive influence of Italian culture, literature, and traditions on the European Renaissance, it is argued here, offers a valuable opportunity to study the intertextual dynamics that contributed to the construction of the Elizabethan and Jacobean theatrical canon. In the specific area of theatrical discourse, the drama of the early modern period is characterized by the systematic appropriation of a complex Italian iconology, exploited both as the origin of poetry and art and as the site of intrigue, vice, and political corruption. Focusing on the construction and the political implications of the dramatic text, this collection analyses early modern English drama within the context of three categories of cultural and ideological appropriation: the rewriting, remaking, and refashioning of the English theatrical tradition in its iconic, thematic, historical, and literary aspects.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations                              ix
Notes on Contributors xi
Acknowledgements xv
Introduction Appropriating Italy: Towards a New
Approach to Renaissance Drama
Michele Marrapodi 1
PART I: REWRITING ITALIAN PROSE AND DRAMA 13
1 Pastoral Jazz from the Writ to the Liberty
Louise George Clubb 15
2 Harlequin/Harlotry in Henry IV Part One
Frances K. Barasch 27
3 The Mirror of all Christian Courtiers:
Castiglione's Cortegiano as a Source for
Henry V
Adam Max Cohen 39
4 Shakespeare's Romantic Italy: Novelistic,
Theatrical, and Cultural Transactions in
the Comedies
Michele Marrapodi 51
5 Virtuosity and Mimesis in the Commedia
dell'arte and Hamlet
Robert Henke 69
6 Gascoigne's Supposes: Englishing Italian
'Error' and Adversarial Reading Practices
Jill Phillips Ingram 83
PART II: REMAKING ITALIAN MYTHS AND CULTURE 97
7 At the cubiculo': Shakespeare's Problems
with Italian Language and Culture
Keith Elam 99
8 Between Myth and Fact: The Merchant of
Venice as Docu-Drama
J.R. Mulryne 111
9 Harington, Troilus and Cressida, and the
Poets' War
Lisa Hopkins 127
10 Shakespeare's Dreams, Sprites, and the
Recognition Game
Nina daVinci Nichols 141
11 Re-make/re-model: Marston's The Malcontent
and Guarinian Tragicomedy
Jason Lawrence 155
PART III: REFASHIONING IDEOLOGY 167
12 Shakespeare and Venice
John Drakakis 169
13 'As if a man were author of himself': the
(Re-)Fashioning of the Oedipal Hero from
Plutarch's Martins to Shakespeare's Coriolanus
Claudia Corti 187
14 'The strongest oaths are straw': Ritual
Inversion in Shakespeare's The Tempest
Victoria Scala Wood 197
15 Learning to Spy: The Tempest as Italianate
Disguised-Duke Play
Michael J. Redmond 207
16 The Courtesan Revisit.xl: Thomas
Middleton, Pietro Aretino, and Sex-phobic
Criticism
Celia R. Daileader 223
PART IV: CODA 239
17 The Music of Words. From Madrigal to Drama
and Beyond: Shakespeare Foreshadowing an
Operatic Technique
Giorgio Melchiori 241
Select Bibliography 251
Index 273