Genetic Engineering of Food : Detection of Genetic Modifications (2003. 300 p.)

個数:
  • ポイントキャンペーン

Genetic Engineering of Food : Detection of Genetic Modifications (2003. 300 p.)

  • ウェブストア価格 ¥22,453(本体¥20,412)
  • WILEY-VCH(2003発売)
  • 外貨定価 EUR 115.00
  • ウェブストア限定 全点ポイント5倍キャンペーン(6/24~6/28)
  • ポイント 1,020pt
  • 在庫がございません。海外の書籍取次会社を通じて出版社等からお取り寄せいたします。
    通常6~9週間ほどで発送の見込みですが、商品によってはさらに時間がかかることもございます。
    重要ご説明事項
    1. 納期遅延や、ご入手不能となる場合がございます。
    2. 複数冊ご注文の場合、分割発送となる場合がございます。
    3. 美品のご指定は承りかねます。
  • 【重要:入荷遅延について】
    ウクライナ情勢悪化・新型コロナウィルス感染拡大により、洋書・洋古書の入荷が不安定になっています。詳しくはこちらをご確認ください。
    海外からのお取り寄せの場合、弊社サイト内で表示している標準的な納期よりもお届けまでに日数がかかる見込みでございます。
    申し訳ございませんが、あらかじめご了承くださいますようお願い申し上げます。
  • ◆画像の表紙や帯等は実物とは異なる場合があります。
  • 製本 Hardcover:ハードカバー版/ページ数 300 p.
  • 商品コード 9783527303090

Full Description


Clarifying the unsolved aspects of labeling novel foods, this book presents the methods, limitations and future perspectives for genetic engineering. Following an overview of recent techniques and applications in plants, animals and microorganisms, a second section - written by expert lawyers - covers the legal issues of genetically engineered food and labeling. The whole is rounded off with methods and strategies for detecting genetic manipulation in food. It is indispensable for industry and laboratories working in food production.

Table of Contents

List of Contributors                               XIV
Part 1 Application and Perspectives 1 (118)
1 Transgenic Modification of Production 3 (23)
Traits in Farm Animals
1.1 The Creation of Transgenic Animals 3 (5)
1.1.1 Pronuclear DNA Microinjection 4 (1)
1.1.2 Retroviral Vectors 5 (1)
1.1.3 Pluripotent Stem Cell Technologies 6 (1)
1.1.4 Nuclear Transfer using Transgenic 6 (1)
Cells
1.1.5 Gene Transfer in Poultry 7 (1)
1.1.6 Gene Transfer in Fish 7 (1)
1.2 Transgenes: Gene Constructs 8 (2)
1.3 Transgenic Animals with Agricultural 10 (8)
Traits
1.3.1 Improved Growth Rate, Carcass 11 (2)
Composition, and Feed Efficiency
1.3.1.1 Transgenes in mammalian farm 11 (1)
animals
1.3.1.2 Transgenes in fish 12 (1)
1.3.2 Alteration of Milk Composition 13 (2)
1.3.3 Improved Animal Health 15 (2)
1.3.3.1 Additive gene transfer of 15 (1)
resistance genes
1.3.3.2 Gene targeting of 16 (1)
susceptibility genes
1.3.4 Improved Biochemical Pathways 17 (1)
1.3.5 Improved Wool Production 17 (1)
1.4 Transgenic Farm Animals and Biosafety 18 (1)
Issues
1.5 Conclusions 19 (7)
2 Genetically Modified Plants 26 (36)
2.1 Methods to Establish Genetically 26 (5)
Modified Plants
2.1.1 Transformation Methods 26 (2)
2.1.1.1 Agrobacterium transformation 26 (1)
2.1.1.2 Direct gene transfer 27 (1)
2.1.2 Tissue Requirements 28 (1)
2.1.3 Molecular Requirements 28 (3)
2.1.3.1 Promoter 28 (1)
2.1.3.2 Codon usage 29 (1)
2.1.3.3 Selectable marker and reporter 29 (2)
genes
2.2 GM Plants Already on the Market (EU, 31 (9)
USA, Canada, Japan)
2.2.1 Herbicide Resistance in Soybean, 33 (2)
Maize, Oilseed rape, Sugar beet, Rice,
and Cotton
2.2.2 Insect Resistance in Maize, 35 (2)
Potatoes, Tomatoes, and Cotton
2.2.3 Virus-resistance, male sterility, 37 (3)
delayed fruit ripening, and fatty acid
contents in GMPs
2.3 GM Plants "in the Pipeline" 40 (12)
2.3.1 Input Traits 40 (6)
2.3.1.1 Insect resistance in rice, 40 (1)
soybean, oilseed rape, eggplant,
walnut, grape, and peanut
2.3.1.2 Disease resistance in maize, 41 (3)
potatoes, fruits, and vegetables
2.3.1.3 Tolerance against abiotic 44 (2)
stresses
2.3.1.4 Improved agronomic properties 46 (1)
2.3.2 Traits Affecting Food Quality for 46 (3)
Human Nutrition
2.3.2.1 Increased carotenoid content in 46 (1)
rice and tomato
2.3.2.2 Elevated iron level in rice and 47 (1)
wheat
2.3.2.3 Improved amino acid composition 47 (1)
in potato plants
2.3.2.4 Reduction in the content of 48 (1)
antinutritive factors in cassava
2.3.2.5 Production of "low-calorie 48 (1)
sugar" in sugar beet
2.3.2.6 Seedless fruits and vegetables 48 (1)
2.3.3 Traits that Affect Processing 49 (13)
2.3.3.1 Altered gluten level in wheat 49 (1)
to change baking quality
2.3.3.2 Altered grain composition in 49 (1)
barley to improve malting quality
2.3.4 Traits of Pharmaceutical Interest 50 (1)
2.3.4.1 Production of vaccines 50 (1)
2.3.4.2 Production of pharmaceuticals 51 (1)
2.4 Outlook 52 (10)
3 Fermented Food Production using Genetically 62 (24)
Modified Yeast and Filamentous Fungi
3.1 Introduction 62 (3)
3.1.1 Why Do We Ferment Foodstuffs? 62 (1)
3.1.2 Fermented Foods of Plant Origin 63 (1)
3.1.3 Fermented Foods of Animal Origin 63 (2)
3.1.4 Conclusion 65 (1)
3.2 Application of Recombinant DNA Methods 65 (6)
3.2.1 Recombinant DNA Technology in Yeast 65 (4)
3.2.1.1 Vectors 67 (2)
3.2.2 Recombinant DNA Technology in 69 (2)
Filamentous Fungi
3.2.2.1 Fungal transformation 69 (2)
3.3 Improved Fermentation Efficiency for 71 (7)
Industrial Application
3.3.1 Industrial Saccharomyces Strains 72 (5)
3.3.1.1 Beer 72 (2)
3.3.1.2 Wine 74 (2)
3.3.1.3 Sake 76 (1)
3.3.1.4 Bread 76 (1)
3.3.2 Other Industrial Yeast Strains 77 (1)
3.3.3 Industrial Filamentous Fungi 78 (1)
3.4 Commercial use of Genetically Modified 78 (1)
Organisms (GMO)
3.5 The Future 79 (7)
4 Production of Food Additives using 86 (14)
Filamentous Fungi
4.1 Filamentous Fungi in Food Production 86 (3)
4.1.1 Industrial Applications 87 (2)
4.2 Additives for the Food Industry 89 (1)
4.3 Design of GMM for Production of Food 90 (5)
Additives and Processing Aids
4.3.1 Gene Disruption 90 (2)
4.3.2 Expression Vectors 92 (3)
4.4 Industrial Enzyme Production Processes 95 (5)
5 Perspectives of Genetic Engineering of 100(19)
Bacteria used in Food Fermentations
5.1 Introduction 100(1)
5.2 Lactic Acid Bacteria 101(3)
5.2.1 Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 101(1)
and subsp. cremoris
5.2.2 Lactobacillus spp. 102(1)
5.2.3 Streptococcus thermophiles 103(1)
5.2.4 Leuconostoc spp. 103(1)
5.2.5 Pediococcus spp. 103(1)
5.2.6 Oenococcus spp. 104(1)
5.3 Perspective and Aims 104(5)
5.3.1 Bioconservation 104(1)
5.3.2 Bacteriophage Resistance 105(2)
5.3.3 Exopolysaccharides 107(1)
5.3.4 Proteolysis 108(1)
5.4 Metabolic Engineering of Lactic Acid 109(1)
Bacteria
5.5 Stress Responses in Lactic Acid Bacteria 110(1)
5.6 Methods 111(1)
5.6.1 Transformation and Vector Systems 111(1)
5.7 Conclusions 112(7)
Part II Legislation in Europe 119(28)
6 The Legal Situation for Genetically 121(26)
Engineered Food in Europe
6.1 Introduction 121(1)
6.1.1 The Need for Regulation 121(1)
6.1.2 The History of the Novel Food 121(1)
Regulation
6.2 Status Quo 122(17)
6.2.1 The Novel Food Regulation 122(7)
6.2.1.1 Introduction 122(1)
6.2.1.2 Scope of application 123(1)
6.2.1.3 Requirements for novel foods 124(1)
and food ingredients
6.2.1.4 Procedures 124(2)
6.2.1.5 Labeling 126(2)
6.2.1.6 Other questions 128(1)
6.2.2 Problems 129(6)
6.2.2.1 Negative labeling 129(1)
6.2.2.2 Compliance with World Trade law 130(1)
6.2.2.3 Competent authorities in the 130(5)
member states
6.2.4 Supplementary and Replacement 135(1)
Regulation
6.2.4.1 History 135(1)
6.2.4.2 Scope of application of the 135(1)
Replacement Regulation
6.2.4.3 Requirements of labeling 136(1)
6.2.5 Relation to Council Directive No 136(1)
90/220/EEC of 23 April 1990 on the
deliberate release into the environment
of genetically modified organisms (OJ
(EC) 1990 No L 117/15; from here on:
Deliberate Release Directive)
6.2.6 Supplementary National Provisions 136(3)
in German law: The Novel Foods and Food
Ingredients Instrument
6.2.6.1 General rules for novel foods 137(1)
6.2.6.2 Rules on labeling of 137(1)
genetically modified soya beans and
genetically modified maize
6.2.6.3 Availability of negative 137(2)
labeling of foodstuffs made without
using procedures of genetic engineering
6.2.6.4 Rules on criminal offences and 139(1)
misdemeanors
6.3 Recent Development at the European Level 139(10)
6.3.1 Introduction 139(1)
6.3.2 The Commission Proposal for a 140(4)
"Regulation of the European Parliament
and of the Council on Genetically
Modified Food and Feed"
6.3.2.1 Objective and definitions 141(1)
6.3.2.2 Requirements of genetically 141(2)
modified food and feed
6.2.2.3 Labeling of genetically 143(1)
modified food and feed
6.3.2.4 General provisions 144(1)
6.3.3 The Commission Proposal for a 144(1)
Regulation of the European Parliament and
of the Council Concerning Traceability
and Labeling of Genetically Modified
Organisms and Traceability of Food and
Feed Products Produced from Genetically
Modified Organisms and Amending Directive
2001/18/EC
6.3.4 Stage of Legislative Procedure 145(2)
Part III Methods of Detection 147(116)
7 Detection of Genetic Modifications: Some 149(6)
Basic Considerations
7.1 The Conversion of Genetic Information 149(1)
from DNA to Phenotypes
7.2 DNA, Protein and Phenotypes as Targets 150(3)
for Detection Assays
7.3 Food-grade Modifications 153(1)
7.4 Detection of Unknown Modifications 154(1)
8 DNA-based Methods for Detection of Genetic 155(19)
Modifications
8.1 Introduction 155(1)
8.2 Recent DNA Methodology 156(2)
8.2.1 Sampling Procedure 156(1)
8.2.2 Extraction and Purification of DNA 157(1)
8.3 Specific Detection of Genetic Material 158(1)
8.3.1 DNA Hybridization-based Detection 158(1)
Technique (Southern Blot)
8.4 Nucleic Acid Amplification Methods 159(5)
using PCR
8.4.1 The Common PCR 159(2)
8.4.2 Real-time PCR 161(2)
8.4.3 Important Bioinformatic 163(1)
Considerations
8.5 Alternative and Promising DNA Detection 164(4)
Techniques
8.5.1 Thermal Cycling Procedures 164(1)
8.5.2 Isothermic Amplification 164(1)
8.5.3 DNA-micro-arrays 165(1)
8.5.4 Mass Spectrometry (MS) of DNA 166(1)
8.5.5 Supplementary Photon-driven 166(1)
Monitoring Methodologies
8.5.6 Novel Biological Monitoring 167(1)
Approaches
8.6 Conclusions and Future Prospects of GMO 168(6)
Detection Applying DNA-analysis
9 Genetic Engineering of Fishes and Methods 174(14)
for Detection
9.1 Introduction 174(1)
9.2 Development and Production of 175(5)
Transgenic Fish
9.2.1 Structure of Gene Cassettes 176(1)
9.2.2 Methods of Gene Transfer 177(1)
9.2.3 Evidence for Gene Transfer and 177(3)
Expression
9.3 Examples of Successful Production of 180(3)
Transgenic Fish
9.3.1 Atlantic Salmon 180(1)
9.3.2 Pacific Salmon 181(1)
9.3.3 Tilapia (O. hornorum hybrid) 182(1)
9.3.4 Tilapia (O. niloticum) 182(1)
9.3.5 Carp 183(1)
9.4 Methods to Detect Processed Transgenic 183(1)
Fish
9.5 Food Safety of Transgenic Fish 183(5)
9.5.1 The Gene Product 184(1)
9.5.2 Pleiotropic Effects 184(4)
10 Detection Methods for Genetically Modified 188(17)
Crops
10.1 Introduction 188(1)
10.2 Isolation of Plant DNA 189(3)
10.2.1 Sampling 189(1)
10.2.2 Sample Preparation 190(1)
10.2.3 DNA Extraction and Analysis 191(1)
10.3 Detection Strategies 192(8)
10.3.1 Screening 193(2)
10.3.2 Specific Detection 195(3)
10.3.2.1 Example for Qualitative 197(1)
Detection
10.3.3 Quantification 198(1)
10.3.4 Verification 198(1)
10.3.5 Validation 199(1)
10.4 Outlook and Conclusions 200(5)
11 Methods to Detect the Application of 205(26)
Genetic Engineering in Composed and Processed
Foods
11.1 Introduction 205(1)
11.2 Challenges Specific to the Detection 206(1)
of GMO in Composed and Processed Foods
11.3 Degradation of Proteins and DNA 207(3)
11.3.1 Proteins 207(1)
11.3.2 DNA 208(2)
11.4 Analytical Approaches 210(13)
11.4.1 Protein-based Methods 210(1)
11.4.2 DNA-based Methods 210(22)
11.4.2.1 Qualitative PCR 211(4)
11.4.2.2 Quantitative PCR 215(1)
11.4.2.3 Competitive PCR 216(2)
11.4.2.4 Real-time PCR 218(5)
11.5 Conclusions 223(8)
12 Mutations in Lactococcus lactic, and their 231(20)
Detection
12.1 Introduction 231(1)
12.2 Composition of the Genome of 232(1)
Lactococcus lactic
12.3 Flexibility in the Genome of 232(5)
Lactococcus lactic
12.3.1 Conjugation 233(1)
12.3.2 Transduction 234(1)
12.3.3 Transformation 235(1)
12.3.4 I S Elements and Transposons 235(1)
12.3.5 Lactococcul Phage as Sources of 236(2)
Genetic Plasticity
12.3.5.1 An example of natural genetic 236(1)
flexibility: the Lactococcus lactic
NCDO712 family
12.4 Mutations in Lactococcus lactic as a 237(1)
Consequence of Environmental Factors and
DNA Metabolism
12.5 Methods to Mutate the Genome of 238(3)
Lactococcus lactis
12.5.1 Genetic Engineering of Lactococcus 238(3)
lactis
12.6 Strategies to Detect Genetically 241(6)
Modified Lactococcus lactis
12.6.1 Sample Preparation 242(1)
12.6.2 DNA-based Procedures 242(2)
12.6.2.1 Southern hybridization 243(1)
12.6.2.2 PCR 243(1)
12.6.3 Nucleotide Sequence-based 244(1)
Procedures
12.6.3.1 Micro-arrays 244(1)
12.6.4 Protein-based Procedures 245(10)
12.6.4.1 Western hybridization 245(1)
12.6.4.2 ELISA 245(1)
12.6.4.3 SPR 246(1)
12.6.4.4 Two-dimensional gel 246(1)
electrophoresis and mass spectrometry
12.7 Conclusions 247(4)
13 Detection Methods for Genetically Modified 251(12)
Microorganisms used in Food Fermentation
Processes
13.1 Introduction 251(1)
13.2 Properties of Microorganisms 252(3)
13.3 Current Methods for Detection of GMM 255(5)
13.3.1 DNA Isolation 256(1)
13.3.2 DNA Stability 257(1)
13.3.3 Organism-specific Detection of GMM 258(2)
13.4 Conclusion 260(3)
Index 263