Practical Service Level Management : Delivering High-Quality Web-Based Services

Practical Service Level Management : Delivering High-Quality Web-Based Services

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  • 製本 Hardcover:ハードカバー版
  • 言語 ENG
  • 商品コード 9781587050794
  • DDC分類 658.0546

Table of Contents

Preface                                            xxi
Part I Service Level Agreements and 3 (56)
Introduction to Service Level Management
Chapter 1 Introduction 5 (8)
E-business Services 5 (3)
B2B 6 (1)
B2C 7 (1)
B2E 8 (1)
Webbed Services and the Webbed Ecosystem 8 (1)
Service Level Management 9 (1)
Structure of the Book 10 (1)
Summary 11 (2)
Chapter 2 Service Level Management 13 (28)
Overview of Service Level Management 14 (3)
The Internal Role of the IT Group 14 (1)
The External Role of the IT Group 15 (1)
The Components of Service Level Management 15 (1)
The Participants in a Service Level 15 (1)
Agreement
Metrics Within a Service Level Agreement 16 (1)
Introduction to Technical Metrics 17 (1)
High-Level Technical Metrics 18 (3)
Workload 18 (1)
Availability 19 (1)
Transaction Failure Rate 20 (1)
Transaction Response Time 20 (1)
File Transfer Time 20 (1)
Stream Quality 20 (1)
Low-Level Technical Metrics 21 (2)
Workload and Availability 21 (1)
Packet Loss 22 (1)
Latency 22 (1)
Jitter 22 (1)
Server Response Time 23 (1)
Measurement Granularity 23 (5)
Measurement Scope 23 (1)
Measurement Sampling Frequency 24 (2)
Measurement Aggregation Interval 26 (2)
Measurement Validation and Statistical 28 (3)
Analysis
Measurement Validation 28 (1)
Statistical Analysis 29 (2)
Business Process Metrics 31 (3)
Problem Management Metrics 33 (1)
Real-Time Service Management Metrics 33 (1)
Service Level Agreements 34 (3)
Summary 37 (4)
Chapter 3 Service Management Architecture 41 (18)
Web Service Delivery Architecture 42 (3)
Service Management Architecture: History 45 (7)
and Design Factors
The Evolution of the Service Management 45 (1)
Environment
Service Management Architectures for 46 (2)
Heterogeneous Systems
Architectural Design Drivers 48 (4)
Demands for Changing, Expanding Services 49 (1)
Multiple Service Providers and Partners 49 (1)
Elastic Boundaries Among Teams and 49 (1)
Providers
Demands for Fast System Management 50 (1)
Data Item Definition and Event Signaling 50 (2)
Service Management Architecture: A General 52 (2)
Example
Instrumentation 52 (1)
Instrumentation Management 53 (1)
SLA Statistics and Reporting 54 (1)
Real-Time Event Handling, Operations, and 54 (1)
Policy
Long-Term Operations 55 (1)
Back-Office Operations 56 (1)
Summary 57 (2)
Part II Components of the Service Level 59 (134)
Management Infrastructure
Chapter 4 Instrumentation 61 (20)
Differences Between Element and Service 61 (2)
Instrumentation
Information for Service Management Decisions 63 (2)
Operational Technical Decisions 64 (1)
Operational Business Decisions 64 (1)
Decisions That Have Long-Term Effect 65 (1)
Instrumentation Modes: Trip Wires and Time 65 (3)
Slices
Trip Wires 66 (1)
Time Slices 67 (1)
The Instrumentation System 68 (5)
Starting with the Instrumentation Managers 69 (1)
Collectors 70 (2)
Aggregators 72 (1)
Processing 72 (1)
Ending with the Instrumentation Manager 73 (1)
Instrumentation Design for Service 73 (4)
Monitoring
Demarcation Points 73 (2)
Passive and Active Monitoring Techniques 75 (1)
Passive Collection 75 (1)
Active Collection 75 (1)
Trade-Offs Between Passive and Active 76 (1)
Collection
Hybrid Systems 77 (1)
Instrumentation Trends 77 (1)
Adaptability 77 (1)
Collaboration 78 (1)
Tighter Linkage for Passive and Active 78 (1)
Collection
Summary 78 (3)
Chapter 5 Event Management 81 (20)
Event Management Overview 82 (3)
Alert Triggers 82 (1)
Reliable Alert Transport 83 (1)
Alert Management 84 (1)
Basic Event Management Functions: Reducing 85 (12)
the Noise and Boosting the Signal
Volume Reduction 86 (2)
Roll-Up Method 86 (1)
De-duplication 87 (1)
Intelligent Monitoring 87 (1)
Artifact Reduction 88 (3)
Verification 88 (1)
Filtering 89 (1)
Correlation 90 (1)
Business Impact: Integrating Technology 91 (3)
and Services
Top-Down and Bottom-Up Approaches 92 (1)
Modeling a Service 92 (1)
Care and Feeding Considerations 93 (1)
Prioritization 94 (1)
Activation 95 (1)
Coordination 96 (1)
A Market-Leading Event Manager: Micromuse 97 (2)
Netcool Product Suite 97 (1)
Event Management 98 (1)
Summary 99 (2)
Chapter 6 Real-Time Operations 101(28)
Reactive Management 103(9)
Triage 104(3)
Root-Cause Analysis 107(3)
Speed Versus Accuracy 107(1)
Case Study of Root-Cause Analysis 108(2)
Complicating Factors 110(2)
Brownouts 110(1)
Virtualized Resources 110(1)
The Value of Good Enough 111(1)
Proactive Management 112(4)
The Benefits of Lead Time 112(1)
Baseline Monitoring 112(1)
The Value of Predicting Behavior 113(1)
Automated Responses 113(3)
Languages Used with Automated Responses 113(1)
A Case Study 114(1)
Step 1: Assessing Local Impact 114(1)
Step 2: Adjusting Thresholds 115(1)
Step 3: Assessing Headroom 115(1)
Step 4: Taking Action 115(1)
Step 5: Reporting 116(1)
Building Automated Responses 116(1)
Picking Candidates for Automation 116(1)
Examples of Commercial Operations Managers 116(5)
Tavve Software's EventWatch 117(1)
ProactiveNet 117(3)
Netuitive 120(1)
Handling DDoS Attacks 121(6)
Traditional Defense Against DDoS 122(2)
Situations
Defense Through Redundancy and Buffering 124(1)
Automated Defenses 124(2)
Organizational Policy for DDoS Defense 126(1)
Summary 127(2)
Chapter 7 Policy-Based Management 129(16)
Policy-Based Management 129(1)
The Need for Policies 130(3)
Management Policies for Elements 131(1)
Service-Centric Policies 132(1)
A Policy Architecture 133(3)
Policy Management Tools 133(1)
Repository 134(1)
Policy Distribution 134(2)
The Pull (Component-Centric) Model 134(1)
The Push (Repository-Centric) Model 135(1)
Hybrid Distribution 135(1)
Enforcers 136(1)
Policy Design 136(3)
Policy Hierarchy 137(1)
Policy Attributes 137(1)
Policy Auditing 138(1)
Policy Closure Criteria 138(1)
Policy Testing 138(1)
Policy Product Examples 139(3)
Cisco QoS Policy Manager 139(2)
Orchestream Service Activator 141(1)
Summary 142(3)
Chapter 8 Managing the Application 145(18)
Infrastructure
Interaction of Operations and Application 146(1)
Development Teams
The Effect of Organizational Structures 146(1)
The Need to Understand the Operational 146(1)
Environment
Time Lines Are Shorter 147(1)
Application-Level Metrics 147(5)
Workload 149(1)
Customer Behavior Measurement 149(1)
Business Measurements 150(1)
Service Quality Measurement 151(1)
Transaction Response Time: An Example of 152(5)
Dependence on Lower-Level Services
Serialization Delay 153(1)
Queuing Delay 154(1)
Propagation Delay 154(2)
Processing Delay 156(1)
The Need for Communications Among Design 156(1)
and Operations Groups
Instrumenting Applications 157(4)
Instrumenting Web Servers 157(2)
Instrumenting Other Server Components 159(1)
End-User Measurements 160(1)
Summary 161(2)
Chapter 9 Managing the Server Infrastructure 163(14)
Architecture of the Server Infrastructure 163(8)
Load Distribution and Front-End Processing 164(4)
Local Load Distribution 166(2)
Geographic Load Distribution 168(1)
Caching 168(1)
Content Distribution 169(2)
Instrumentation of the Server Infrastructure 171(3)
Load Distribution Instrumentation 172(1)
Cache Instrumentation 173(1)
Content Distribution Instrumentation 173(1)
Summary 174(3)
Chapter 10 Managing the Transport 177(16)
Infrastructure
Technical Quality Metrics for Transport 178(3)
Services
Workload and Bandwidth 178(1)
Availability and Packet Loss 179(1)
One-Way Latency 180(1)
Round-Trip Latency 181(1)
Jitter 181(1)
QoS Technologies 181(7)
Tag-Based QoS 182(3)
IEEE 802 LAN QoS 182(1)
IP TOS 183(1)
IP DiffServ 183(1)
MPLS 183(1)
RSVP 184(1)
Traffic-Shaping QoS 185(3)
Rate Control 186(1)
Queuing 187(1)
Over-provisioning and Isolated Networks 188(1)
Managing Data Flows Among Organizations 188(3)
Levels of Control 189(1)
Demarcation Points 189(1)
Diagnosis and Recovery 189(2)
Summary 191(2)
Part III Long-term Service Level Management 193(24)
Functions
Chapter 11 Load Testing 195(14)
The Performance Envelope 196(3)
Load Testing Benchmarks 199(1)
Load Test Beds and Load Generators 200(3)
Building Transaction Load-Test Scripts and 203(2)
Profiles
Using the Test Results 205(1)
Summary 206(3)
Chapter 12 Modeling and Capacity Planning 209(8)
Advantages of Simulation Modeling 209(2)
Complexity of Simulation Modeling 211(1)
Simulation Model Examples 211(3)
Model Construction 211(2)
Model Validation 213(1)
Reporting 214(1)
Capacity Planning 214(1)
Summary 215(2)
Part IV Planning and Implementation of Service 217(42)
Level Management
Chapter 13 ROI: Making the Business Case 219(12)
Impact of ROI on the Organization 220(1)
A Basic ROI Model 220(6)
The ROI Mission Statement 222(1)
Project Costs 223(1)
Project Benefits 223(8)
Availability Benefits 224(1)
Performance Benefits 225(1)
Staffing Benefits 225(1)
Infrastructure Benefits 225(1)
Deployment Benefits 225(1)
Soft Benefits 226(1)
ROI Case Study 226(2)
Summary 228(3)
Chapter 14 Implementing Service Level 231(14)
Management
Phased Implementation of SLM 231(2)
Choosing the Initial Project 231(1)
Incremental Aggregation 232(1)
An SLM Project Implementation Plan 233(4)
Census and Documentation of the Existing 233(1)
System
Specification of Performance Metrics 234(1)
Instrumentation Choices and Locations 235(4)
Passive Measurements 236(1)
Active Measurements 236(1)
Baseline of Existing System Performance 237(1)
Investigation of System Performance 237(2)
Sensitivities and System Tuning
Construction of SLAs 239(3)
Roles and Responsibilities 240(1)
Reporting Mechanisms and Scheduled Reviews 240(1)
Dispute Resolution 241(1)
Summary 242(3)
Chapter 15 Future Developments 245(14)
The Demands of Speed and Dynamism 245(3)
Evolution of Management Systems Integration 248(2)
Superficial Integration 248(1)
Data Integration 248(1)
Event Integration 249(1)
Process Integration 250(1)
Architectural Trends for Web Management 250(4)
Systems
Loosely Coupled Service-Management 251(2)
Systems Architecture
Process Managers 251(1)
Clustering and the Webbed Architecture 252(1)
Integrating the Components with 252(1)
Signaling and Messaging
Loosely Coupled Service-Management 253(1)
Processes
Business Goals for Service Performance 254(1)
Finding the Best Tools 255(1)
Summary 256(3)
Index 259