Quantum Theory Cannot Hurt You : Understanding the Mind-blowing Building Blocks of the Universe

個数:
  • ポイントキャンペーン

Quantum Theory Cannot Hurt You : Understanding the Mind-blowing Building Blocks of the Universe

  • ウェブストア価格 ¥1,426(本体¥1,321)
  • Faber & Faber(2014/09発売)
  • 外貨定価 US$ 13.00
  • ウェブストア夏のポイント5倍キャンペーン
  • ポイント 65pt
  • 在庫がございません。海外の書籍取次会社を通じて出版社等からお取り寄せいたします。
    通常6~9週間ほどで発送の見込みですが、商品によってはさらに時間がかかることもございます。
    重要ご説明事項
    1. 納期遅延や、ご入手不能となる場合がございます。
    2. 複数冊ご注文の場合、分割発送となる場合がございます。
    3. 美品のご指定は承りかねます。

  • ウェブストア価格 ¥1,342(本体¥1,243)
  • Faber & Faber(2014/09発売)
  • 外貨定価 UK£ 9.99
  • ウェブストア夏のポイント5倍キャンペーン
  • ポイント 60pt
  • 提携先の海外書籍取次会社に在庫がございます。通常約2週間で発送いたします。
    重要ご説明事項
    1. 納期遅延や、ご入手不能となる場合が若干ございます。
    2. 複数冊ご注文の場合、分割発送となる場合がございます。
    3. 美品のご指定は承りかねます。
  • ≪洋書のご注文につきまして≫ 「海外取次在庫あり」および「国内仕入れ先からお取り寄せいたします」表示の商品でも、納期の目安期間内にお届けできないことがございます。あらかじめご了承ください。

  • 製本 Paperback:紙装版/ペーパーバック版/ページ数 224 p.
  • 言語 ENG
  • 商品コード 9780571315024
  • DDC分類 530

Full Description


The two towering achievements of modern physics are quantum theory and Einstein's general theory of relativity. Together, they explain virtually everything about the world we live in. But, almost a century after their advent, most people haven't the slightest clue what either is about.Did you know that there's so much empty space inside matter that the entire human race could be squeezed into the volume of a sugar cube? Or that you grow old more quickly on the top floor of a building than on the ground floor? And did you realize that 1% of the static on a TV tuned between stations is the relic of the Big Bang? Marcus Chown, the bestselling author of What A Wonderful World and the Solar System app, explains all with characteristic wit, colour and clarity, from the Big Bang and Einstein's general theory of relativity to probability, gravity and quantum theory. 'Chown discusses special and general relativity, probablity waves, quantum entanglement, gravity and the Big Bang, with humour and beautiful clarity, always searching for the most vivid imagery.' Steven Poole, Guardian