Nomadic Desert Birds (Adaptations of Desert Organisms) (2004. 170 p. w. 63 figs. 24 cm)

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Nomadic Desert Birds (Adaptations of Desert Organisms) (2004. 170 p. w. 63 figs. 24 cm)

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  • 製本 Hardcover:ハードカバー版/ページ数 170 p.
  • 商品コード 9783540403937

Full Description


My interest in the behaviour and movements of birds of arid and semi-arid ecosystems began when my wife, Sue Milton, and I were Roy Siegfried, Director, at that time, of the Percy approached by Prof. FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology, to set up a project to investigate granivory in the South African Karoo. Sue and I spent some time finding a suitable study site, setting up accommodations and an automatic weather station at Tierberg, in the southern Karoo near the village of Prince Albert, and planning projects. Among our first projects was a transect where we noted plant phe nology, measured seed densities on the soil surface, counted birds, observed ant activity, measured soil surface temperatures and col lected whatever climate data we could at 40 sites along a 200-km oval route. Along the way, we became interested in the marked presence and absence of birds at certain sites - abundant birds one day, and very few birds at the same site a month later. Subsequent counts along fixed transects through shrublands confirmed that a number of bird species were highly nomadic over short and long distances, locally and regionally, leading to speculation on how widespread these movements were in the arid ecosystems of the world.

Table of Contents

1 Introduction                                     1  (16)
1.1 Arid and Semi-Arid Regions 5 (1)
1.2 The Avifauna of Deserts and Semi-Deserts 5 (12)
2 Migrations and Movements of Desert Birds 17 (20)
2.1 Movements in Desert and Semi-Desert 20 (7)
Avifaunas: An Overview
2.2 Migrants in Arid Ecosystems 27 (2)
2.3 Residents in Arid Ecosystems 29 (6)
2.3.1 How Sedentary Are "Resident" Birds? 31 (4)
2.4 Conclusions 35 (2)
3 The Nomadic Avifauna 37 (44)
3.1 The Influence of Rainfall and Temperature 37 (6)
on Movements in Birds
3.2 Predictability of Movements by 43 (32)
Non-migratory Birds in Arid Ecosystems
3.2.1 Southern Africa 51 (2)
3.2.2 North Africa 53 (2)
3.2.3 Asia 55 (4)
3.2.4 North America 59 (2)
3.2.5 South America 61 (5)
3.2.6 Australia 66 (9)
3.3 Phylogeny of Nomadic Birds 75 (3)
3.4 Conclusions 78 (3)
4 Habitats and Densities of Nomadic Birds 81 (20)
4.1 Habitats 81 (16)
4.1.1 Patchiness in Time and Space 92 (5)
4.2 Densities of Nomadic Birds 97 (2)
4.3 Conclusions 99 (2)
5 Food and Foraging 101(22)
5.1 Food of Nomadic Birds 101(17)
5.2 Foraging Behaviour 118(2)
5.3 Conclusions 120(3)
6 Reproduction, Moult and Mortality 123(22)
6.1 Nest Sites in Nomadic Birds 124(8)
6.1.1 A Case Study: Nest Site Selection in 128(2)
Wattled Starlings Creatophora cinerea, a
Nomadic Insectivore
6.1.2 Nest Construction and the Importance 130(2)
of Nest Materials as Indicators of
Resources for Breeding
6.2 Breeding Seasons 132(2)
6.3 Clutch Sizes and Nestling Periods in Arid 134(4)
and Semi-Arid South Africa
6.5 Breeding Success 138(2)
6.6 Moult 140(2)
6.7 Conclusions 142(3)
7 The Conservation of Nomadic Desert Birds 145(4)
Appendix 149(10)
References 159(18)
Subject Index 177