Immigration (Great Speeches in History)

  • ポイントキャンペーン

Immigration (Great Speeches in History)

  • ただいまウェブストアではご注文を受け付けておりません。 ⇒古書を探す
  • 製本 Paperback:紙装版/ペーパーバック版/ページ数 144 p.
  • 言語 ENG
  • 商品コード 9780737718751
  • DDC分類 325.73

Table of Contents

Foreword                                           8  (2)
Introduction: Speaking Out on Immigration 10 (18)
Chapter 1: Voices of American Pluralists
1. Immigrants Deserve Public Assistance 28 (5)
Joseph Priestley
Americans should provide immigrants with
both social accommodation and financial
assistance. The poor from foreign lands
seek only opportunity and freedom, and if
given a chance, they w 1 rise to become
productive and beneficial members of
society.
2. The Strength of Democracy 33 (9)
Carl Schurz
The defining principle of democracy as
established by the founding fathers is
the doctrine of equal rights for all
citizens. America's strength lies in its
tolerance and its belief that every man
should have the right to self-government.
3. Immigration Quotas Are Un-American 42 (5)
Robert H. Clancy
Immigrant quotas established by Congress
antagonize racial hatred and mock
American principles. Most immigrants are
moral, industrious residents who
contribute to the character and
well-being of the nation.
4. The Historical Contributions of America's 47 (6)
Immigrants
Harold Fields
We must not discourage immigration or
disparage aliens. Countless immigrants
have contributed to the nation's
prosperity and repute. Alexander
Hamilton, John Muir, Jacob Riis, and
Alexander Graham Bell are but a few
examples of immigrants whose presence has
greatly enriched the United States.
5. My Fellow Immigrants 53 (3)
Franklin D. Roosevelt
In a plainspoken address to the
traditionally classbiased Daughters of
the American Revolution, the president
lends the weight of his office to the
argument for pluralism in America.
6. Eliminating Nationality Quotas 56 (7)
John F. Kennedy
Immigrants are a source of strength for
America and therefore should not be
deterred from moving to the United
States. Essential modifications to U.S.
immigration policy, including an end to
discriminatory quotas, will benefit all
Americans.
Chapter 2: Voices Opposed to Increased or
Unregulated Immigration
1. Immigration Threatens the Nation's 63 (6)
Political Structure
Garrett Davis
Most immigrants are ignorant of the
workings of constitutional government and
are easy prey for unscrupulous
politicians who seek to subvert the
safeguards of America's democratic
process. If not the federal government,
then at least the states should impose
restrictions on immigration to avoid
catastrophe.
2. Unchecked Chinese Immigration 69 (6)
Edwin R. Meade
Chinese laborers, or "coolies," pose a
threat to Christian civilization and
America's economic and political
stability. Working for low wages, these
"animal machines" steal jobs from white
laborers while remaining ignorant of
democracy and the nation's institutions.
Prohibiting Asian immigration is the only
solution to the problem.
3. Preserving the American Race 75 (5)
Henry Cabot Lodge
Restrictionist legislation would help
ensure that the racial character of
Anglo-Saxons in America w 1 avoid
becoming polluted by unskilled, ignorant
foreigners. Preventing the intellectual
and social decline of the nation is a
moral imperative that Americans cannot
ignore.
4. Shut the Door on Immigration 80 (5)
Ellison DuRant Smith
Eugenicists such as Madison Grant are
correct in their predictions that
inferior immigrant races threaten to
dilute the intellect and character of
America's Anglo-Saxon stock. These
immigrant masses also swallow up the
nation's resources. The restriction of
immigration demanded by the 1924
Immigration Act is vital to the survival
of the nation.
5. Immigration Quotas Are Necessary 85 (9)
Marion Moncure Duncan
Liberalization of immigration laws,
including the repeal of the quotas set by
the Immigration and Nationality Act of
1952, would provoke economic bankruptcy,
disrupt moral values, and "overturn the
balance of our national character."
6. A Selective Immigration Policy Will Ensure 94 (8)
Social and Cultural Unity
Pat Buchanan
America should adopt an immigration
policy that restricts entrance to a few
worthy immigrant candidates. If the
government is not selective, the nation
may be fractured into many different
ethnic enclaves.
Chapter 3: Perspectives on Assimilation
1. Assimilation and the American Zionist 102(4)
Richard Gottheil
Assimilation is disadvantageous,
unfeasible, and for Jewish people the
process would be tantamount to a death
sentence. For those who wish to end
Jewish immigration into the United
States, the answer is to create a home
country for Jewish people.
2. Americanism and the Foreign Born 106(5)
Woodrow Wilson
Newly sworn citizens must now think of
themselves as Americans rather than
members of a particular ethnic group, and
to this end must also dedicate themselves
to American assimilation.
3. Cultural Identity Is a Source of Pride 111(7)
Patsy T. Mink
American society places a premium on
conformity. Asian American children must
learn about the history of anti-Japanese
racism in the United States, and all
children of immigrants should study the
history of their ancestors' homelands.
4. Toward a Common Identity 118(9)
Linda Chavez
Public policy must encourage assimilation
of immigrants because multiculturalism is
both undesirable and impossible. Cultural
heritage is within the purview of the
community, not the state or federal
governments.
Chapter 4: The Impact of Immigration
1. The Immigrant and Social Unrest 127(5)
Jane Addams
Immigrants are hardworking people with as
much value for human life as native-born
citizens. They should not be made
scapegoats or blamed for social unrest.
2. Economic Well-Being Depends on Tolerance 132(8)
Eric A. Johnston
The wide variety of races that form U.S.
citizenry strengthens the nation's
economy and its character. Only through
tolerance can the nation progress and
prosper.
3. Illegal Immigration Policy Must Be Humane 140(5)
Antonia Hern疣dez
There are much better ways to combat
illegal immigration than measures such as
California Proposition 187. This
legislation would punish both the
voiceless victims, and the taxpayers who
would ultimately foot the bill.
4. Facing the Challenges of Diversity 145(8)
William J. Clinton
At the cusp of the twenty-first century,
the United States experienced its
greatest wave of immigration in more than
one hundred years. As a result, Americans
must come to terms with this increased
diversity; within the next fifty years,
the nation's population will have no
majority race.
Appendix of Biographies 153(10)
Chronology 163(5)
For Further Research 168(4)
Index 172