Developing Software for Symbian OS : A Beginner's Guide to Creating Symbian OS V9 Smartphone Applications in C++ (2ND)

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Developing Software for Symbian OS : A Beginner's Guide to Creating Symbian OS V9 Smartphone Applications in C++ (2ND)

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  • 製本 Paperback:紙装版/ペーパーバック版/ページ数 438 p.
  • 言語 ENG
  • 商品コード 9780470725702
  • DDC分類 621.38456

Full Description


Many problems encountered by engineers developing code for specialized Symbian subsystems boil down to a lack of understanding of the core Symbian programming concepts. Developing Software for Symbian OS remedies this problem as it provides a comprehensive coverage of all the key concepts. Numerous examples and descriptions are also included, which focus on the concepts the author has seen developers struggle with the most. The book covers development ranging from low-level system programming to end user GUI applications. It also covers the development and packaging tools, as well as providing some detailed reference and examples for key APIs. The new edition includes a completely new chapter on platform security. The overall goal of the book is to provide introductory coverage of Symbian OS v9 and help developers with little or no knowledge of Symbian OS to develop as quickly as possible. There are few people with long Symbian development experience compared to demand, due to the rapid growth of Symbian in recent years, and developing software for new generation wireless devices requires knowledge and experience of OS concepts.This book will use many comparisons between Symbian OS and other OSes to help in that transition. Get yourself ahead with the perfect introduction to developing software for Symbian OS.

Table of Contents

Foreword (Jo Stichbury)                            ix
Foreword (Warren Day) xi
Biography xiii
Author Acknowledgments xv
Symbian Press Acknowledgments xv
Symbian OS Code Conventions and Notations Used xix
in the Book
Smartphones and Symbian OS 1 (22)
Notes on this New Edition 1 (1)
Smartphone Concepts 2 (1)
Smartphone Features 3 (8)
The Mobile OS 11 (1)
Symbian OS-A Little History 12 (3)
Symbian OS Smartphones 15 (5)
Other Smartphone Operating Systems 20 (3)
Symbian OS Quick Start 23 (40)
What Do You Need to Get Started? 23 (8)
Firing Up the Development Tools 31 (7)
Simple Example Application 38 (18)
Building and Executing on the Emulator 56 (2)
A Carbide.c++ Project 58 (1)
Building for the Smartphone 59 (4)
Symbian OS Architecture 63 (30)
Components in Symbian OS 63 (1)
Multitasking in Symbian OS 64 (1)
Shared Code: Libraries, DLLs, and 65 (3)
Frameworks
Client-Server Model 68 (2)
Memory in Symbian OS 70 (7)
The Kernel 77 (4)
Active Objects and Asynchronous Functions 81 (2)
GUI Architecture 83 (2)
High-Performance Graphics 85 (1)
The Communication Architecture 86 (4)
Application Engines and Services 90 (1)
Platform Security 90 (3)
Symbian OS Programming Basics 93 (30)
Use of C++ in Symbian OS 93 (1)
Non-standard C++ Characteristics 94 (1)
Basic Data Types 94 (1)
Symbian OS Classes 95 (6)
Exception Error Handling and Cleanup 101 (14)
Libraries 115 (3)
Executable Files 118 (1)
Naming Conventions 119 (3)
Summary 122 (1)
Symbian OS Build Environment 123 (38)
SDK Directory Structure 123 (3)
Build System Overview 126 (1)
Basic Build Flow 126 (5)
Build Targets 131 (4)
What is a UID? 135 (2)
The Emulator 137 (4)
Building Shared Libraries 141 (3)
DLL Interface Freezing 144 (5)
Installing Applications on the Smartphone 149 (12)
Strings, Buffers, and Data Collections 161 (56)
Introducing the Text Console 161 (4)
Descriptors for Strings and Binary Data 165 (3)
The Descriptor Classes 168 (18)
Descriptor Methods 186 (12)
Converting Between 8-Bit and 16-Bit 198 (1)
Descriptors
Dynamic Buffers 199 (4)
Templates in Symbian OS 203 (2)
Arrays 205 (8)
Other Data Collection Classes 213 (4)
Platform Security and Symbian Signed 217 (30)
What is Platform Security? 217 (1)
What Platform Security is Not 218 (1)
What this Means to a Developer 219 (1)
Capabilities for API Security 219 (13)
Application Signing in Symbian 232 (6)
Getting Your Application Symbian Signed 238 (6)
Developer Certificates 244 (3)
Asynchronous Functions and Active Objects 247 (30)
Asynchronous Functions 247 (2)
Introducing Active Objects 249 (5)
The Active Scheduler 254 (4)
Active Scheduler Error Handling 258 (2)
Active Object Priorities 260 (1)
Canceling Outstanding Requests 260 (2)
Removing an Active Object 262 (1)
Active Object Example 262 (7)
Active Object Issues 269 (2)
Using Active Objects for Background Tasks 271 (6)
Processes, Threads, and Synchronization 277 (26)
Processes 277 (9)
Using Threads on Symbian OS 286 (6)
Sharing Memory Between Processes 292 (1)
Memory Chunks 293 (4)
Thread Synchronization 297 (6)
Client-Server Framework 303 (20)
Client-Server Overview 304 (1)
A Look at the Client-Server Classes 305 (1)
Client-Server Example 306 (17)
Symbian OS TCP/IP Network Programming 323 (36)
Introduction to TCP/IP 324 (3)
Network Programming Using Sockets 327 (7)
Symbian OS Socket API 334 (11)
Example: Retrieving Weather Information 345 (11)
Making a Network Connection 356 (3)
GUI Application Programming 359 (54)
Symbian OS User Interfaces 360 (5)
Anatomy of a GUI Application 365 (2)
Application Classes 367 (10)
Resource Files 377 (10)
Dialogs 387 (18)
Symbian OS Controls 405 (4)
View Architecture 409 (1)
Application Icon and Caption 409 (4)
References 413 (2)
Index 415