How to Count Animals, More or Less (Uehiro Series in Practical Ethics)

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How to Count Animals, More or Less (Uehiro Series in Practical Ethics)

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  • 提携先の海外書籍取次会社に在庫がございます。通常約2週間で発送いたします。
    重要ご説明事項
    1. 納期遅延や、ご入手不能となる場合が若干ございます。
    2. 複数冊ご注文の場合、分割発送となる場合がございます。
    3. 美品のご指定は承りかねます。
  • 製本 Hardcover:ハードカバー版/ページ数 309 p.
  • 言語 ENG,ENG
  • 商品コード 9780198829676
  • DDC分類 170

Full Description


Most people agree that animals count morally, but how exactly should we take animals into account? A prominent stance in contemporary ethical discussions is that animals have the same moral status that people do, and so in moral deliberation the similar interests of animals and people should be given the very same consideration. In How to Count Animals, more or less, Shelly Kagan sets out and defends a hierarchical approach in which people count more thananimals do and some animals count more than others. For the most part, moral theories have not been developed in such a way as to take account of differences in status. By arguing for a hierarchical account of morality - and exploring what status sensitive principles might look like - Kagan reveals just howmuch work needs to be done to arrive at an adequate view of our duties toward animals, and of morality more generally.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments                                    ix
Introduction 1 (5)
1 Standing 6 (31)
1.1 Standing and Status 6 (4)
1.2 Sentience 10 (6)
1.3 Agency 16 (7)
1.4 Agency without Sentience 23 (7)
1.5 Welfare and Standing 30 (7)
2 Unitarianism 37 (21)
2.1 Unitarianism 37 (5)
2.2 The Greater Harm 42 (3)
2.3 Comparing Lives 45 (7)
2.4 Hierarchy 52 (6)
3 The Argument from Distribution 58 (21)
3.1 Distributive Principles 58 (4)
3.2 The Argument from Distribution 62 (7)
3.3 Replies 69 (10)
4 Hierarchy and the Value of Outcomes 79 (33)
4.1 Hierarchy in Distribution 79 (8)
4.2 Problems for Priority 87 (9)
4.3 Well-Being 96 (5)
4.4 Dismissing the View 101(7)
4.5 The Status Adjusted Value of 108(4)
Well-Being
5 Status 112(34)
5.1 Grounds of Status 112(5)
5.2 Individualism 117(4)
5.3 Which Capacities? 121(9)
5.4 Potential 130(7)
5.5 Modal Status 137(9)
6 Worries about Hierarchy 146(24)
6.1 Elitism 146(3)
6.2 Superior Beings 149(7)
6.3 Marginal Cases 156(8)
6.4 Normal Variation 164(6)
7 Deontology 170(21)
7.1 Consequentialism and Deontology 170(4)
7.2 Absolutist Deontology 174(5)
7.3 Moderate Deontology 179(5)
7.4 Some Calculations 184(7)
8 Restricted Deontology 191(24)
8.1 Excluding Animals from Deontology 191(3)
8.2 Autonomy 194(7)
8.3 Resisting the Argument 201(6)
8.4 Dichotomous Properties 207(8)
9 Hierarchical Deontology 215(33)
9.1 Weaker Rights 215(4)
9.2 Thresholds 219(12)
9.3 Meeting the Threshold 231(7)
9.4 Other Principles 238(10)
10 Defense 248(31)
10.1 The Right to Self-Defense 248(4)
10.2 Defending Animals 252(6)
10.3 Defending Against Animals 258(9)
10.4 Defending Animals Against Animals 267(7)
10.5 More on Proportionality 274(5)
11 Limited Hierarchy 279(26)
11.1 A Suitable Step Function 279(5)
11.2 Practical Realism 284(8)
11.3 The View that Emerges 292(7)
11.4 Pretense 299(3)
11.5 How to Count Animals 302(3)
References 305(2)
Index 307