Fundamentals of Language (Janua Linguarum. Series Minor Vol.1) (2. Aufl. 2002. 96 p. 230 mm)

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Fundamentals of Language (Janua Linguarum. Series Minor Vol.1) (2. Aufl. 2002. 96 p. 230 mm)

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  • 製本 Paperback:紙装版/ペーパーバック版/ページ数 96 p.
  • 言語 ENG
  • 商品コード 9783110172836

基本説明

2002 Mouton de Gruyter 25th anniversary price 40 % off.

Full Description


"Jakobson and Halle's initial statement of the principles of linguistic organization should be made available to all future generations of linguists. It builds a solid foundation for Saussurean thinking about linguisic oppositions and establishes distinctive feature theory as the basis of their formal treatment." Prof. Dr. William Labov, University of Pennsylvania, Department of Linguistics

Table of Contents

Foreword                                           5 (13)
PART I: PHONOLOGY AND PHONETICS
The feature level of language 13(5)
Distinctive features in operation 13(1)
Structure of distinctive features 14(1)
Opposition and contrast 15(1)
Message and code 15(1)
Ellipsis and explicitness 15(3)
The variety of features and their treatment 18(13)
in linguistics
Phonology and phonemics 18(1)
The `inner' approach to the phoneme in 19(1)
relation to sound
Types of features 20(2)
The `outer' approaches to the phoneme in 22(6)
relation to sound
The mentalist view 22(1)
The code-restricting view 23(1)
The generic view 23(1)
The fictionalist view 24(2)
The algebraic view 26(2)
The cryptanalyst's and decoder's devices 28(3)
as two complementary techniques
The identification of distinctive features 31(19)
Syllable 31(2)
Two kinds of distinctive features 33(1)
Classification of prosodic features 33(3)
Force features 34(1)
Quantity features 34(1)
Tone features 35(1)
The interconnection between stress and 36(1)
length
Comparison of prosodic and inherent 36(2)
features
General laws of phonemic patterning 38(2)
Restrictions in the overall inventory 38(2)
of distinctive features
The three classes of inherent features 40(4)
Sonority features 40(3)
Protensity features 43(1)
Tonality features 43(1)
Stages of the speech event 44(6)
The use of different stages in the 46(2)
study of distinctive features
Nomenclature of distinctive features 48(2)
Phonemic patterning 50(19)
Stratification 50(8)
The nuclear syllable 50(1)
The role of the nasal consonant 51(1)
The primary triangle 51(1)
The split of the primary triangle into 52(1)
two triangles, consonantal and vocalic
Patterning of oral resonance features 53(2)
Sonority features in relation to the 55(3)
optimal consonant and vowel
The dichotomous scale 58(3)
The spatio-temporal pattern of phonemic 61(8)
operations
Selected list of studies in general 64(5)
phonology (till 1966)
PART II: TWO ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE AND TWO
TYPES OF APHASIC DISTURBANCES
The linguistic problems of aphasia 69(3)
The twofold character of language 72(5)
Similarity disorder 77(8)
Contiguity disorder 85(5)
The metaphoric and metonymic poles 90