Requirements Engineering (Practitioner Series)

Requirements Engineering (Practitioner Series)

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  • 製本 Paperback:紙装版/ペーパーバック版/ページ数 213 p.
  • 言語 ENG,ENG
  • 商品コード 9781852335779
  • DDC分類 620.001171

Full Description


Written for those who want to develop their knowledge of requirements engineering process, whether practitioners or students. Using the latest research and driven by practical experience from industry, this book gives useful hints to practitioners on how to write and structure requirements. - Explains the importance of Systems Engineering and the creation of effective solutions to problems - Describes the underlying representations used in system modeling - data flow diagrams; statecharts; object-oriented approaches - Covers a generic multi-layer requirements process - Discusses the key elements of effective requirements management - Includes a chapter written by one of the developers of rich traceability - Introduces an overview of DOORS - a software tool which serves as an enabler of a requirements management processAdditional material and links are available at: http://www requirementsengineering.info"In recent years we have been finding ourselves with a shortage of engineers with good competence in requirements engineering.Perhaps this is in part because requirements management tool vendors have persuaded management that a glitzy tool will solve their requirements engineering problems. Of course, the tools only make it possible for engineers who understand requirements engineering to do a better job. This book goes a long way towards building a foundational set of skills in requirements engineering, so that today's powerful tools can be used sensibly. Of particular value is a recognition of the place software requirements have within the system context, and of ways for dealing with that sensitive connection. This is an important book. I think its particular value in industry will be to bring the requirements engineers and their internal customers to a practical common understanding of what can and should be achieved." (Byron Purves, Technical Fellow, The Boeing Company)

Table of Contents

        List of Figures                            xvii
List of Tables xxiii
Introduction 1 (22)
Introduction to Requirements 1 (3)
Introduction to Systems Engineering 4 (3)
Requirements and Quality 7 (1)
Requirements and the Lifecycle 8 (3)
Requirements Traceability 11 (4)
Requirements and Modelling 15 (2)
Requirements and Testing 17 (1)
Requirements in the Problem and Solution 18 (3)
Domains
How to Read This Book 21 (2)
A Generic Process for Requirements Engineering 23 (24)
Introduction 23 (1)
Developing Systems 23 (3)
Generic Process Context 26 (4)
Input Requirements and Derived 27 (1)
Requirements
Acceptance Criteria and Qualification 28 (2)
Strategy
Generic Process Introduction 30 (2)
Ideal Development 30 (1)
Development in the Context of Change 31 (1)
Generic Process Information Model 32 (6)
Information Classes 33 (2)
Agreement State 35 (1)
Qualification State 36 (1)
Satisfaction State 37 (1)
Information Model Constraints 37 (1)
Generic Process Details 38 (7)
Agreement Process 38 (2)
Analyze and Model 40 (2)
Derive Requirements and Qualification 42 (3)
Strategy
Summary 45 (2)
System Modelling for Requirements Engineering 47 (28)
Introduction 47 (1)
Representations for Requirements Engineering 47 (13)
Data Flow Diagrams 47 (7)
Entity Relationship Diagrams 54 (1)
State Transition Diagrams 55 (1)
Statecharts 56 (1)
Object-oriented Approaches 57 (3)
Representations and Information 60 (1)
Methods 61 (12)
What Is in a Method? 61 (1)
Structured Methods 61 (5)
Object-oriented Methods 66 (5)
Formal Methods 71 (2)
Summary 73 (2)
Writing and Reviewing Requirements 75 (18)
Introduction 75 (1)
Requirements for Requirements 76 (1)
Structuring Requirements Documents 77 (2)
Key Requirements 79 (1)
Using Attributes 79 (1)
Ensuring Consistency Across Requirements 80 (2)
Value of a Requirement 82 (1)
The Language of Requirements 83 (2)
Requirement Boilerplates 85 (2)
Granularity of Requirements 87 (2)
Criteria for Writing Requirements Statements 89 (2)
Summary 91 (2)
Requirements Engineering in the Problem Domain 93 (24)
What Is the Problem Domain? 93 (2)
Instantiating the Generic Process 95 (1)
Agree Requirements with Customer 96 (1)
Analyze and Model 96 (7)
Identify Stakeholders 96 (3)
Create Use Scenarios 99 (3)
Scoping the System 102 (1)
Derive Requirements 103 (11)
Define Structure 104 (3)
Capture Requirements 107 (7)
Derive Qualification Strategy 114 (2)
Define Acceptance Criteria 114 (1)
Define Qualification Strategy 115 (1)
Summary 116 (1)
Requirements Engineering in the Solution 117 (24)
Domain
What Is the Solution Domain? 117 (2)
Engineering Requirements from Stakeholder 119 (17)
Requirements to System Requirements
Producing the System Model 120 (1)
Creating System Models to Derive System 120 (6)
Requirements
Banking Example 126 (3)
Car Example 129 (5)
Deriving Requirements from a System Model 134 (2)
Agreeing the System Requirements with the 136 (1)
Design Team
Engineering Requirements from System 136 (3)
Requirements to Subsystems
Creating a System Architecture Model 137 (1)
Deriving Requirements from an 138 (1)
Architectural Design Model
Other Transformations Using a Design 139 (1)
Architecture
Summary 140 (1)
Advanced Traceability 141 (20)
Introduction 141 (1)
Elementary Traceability 141 (2)
Satisfaction Arguments 143 (5)
Requirements Allocation 148 (1)
Reviewing Traceability 148 (1)
The Language of Satisfaction Arguments 149 (1)
Rich Traceability Analysis 150 (1)
Rich Traceability for Qualification 151 (1)
Implementing Rich Traceability 151 (1)
Single-layer Rich Traceability 151 (1)
Multi-layer Rich Traceability 151 (1)
Metrics for Traceability 152 (6)
Breadth 153 (1)
Depth 153 (1)
Growth 153 (2)
Balance 155 (1)
Latent Change 156 (2)
Summary 158 (3)
Management Aspects of Requirements Engineering 161 (26)
Introduction to Management 161 (2)
Requirements Management Problems 163 (2)
Summary of Requirement Management Problems 164 (1)
Managing Requirements in an Acquisition 165 (5)
Organization
Planning 165 (3)
Monitoring 168 (1)
Changes 168 (2)
Supplier Organizations 170 (8)
Bid Management 171 (4)
Development 175 (3)
Product Organizations 178 (6)
Planning 178 (4)
Monitoring 182 (1)
Changes 183 (1)
Summary 184 (3)
Planning 184 (1)
Monitoring 184 (1)
Changes 185 (2)
DOORS: A Tool to Manage Requirements 187 (18)
Introduction 187 (1)
The Case for Requirements Management 187 (1)
DOORS Architecture 188 (1)
Projects, Modules and Objects 189 (7)
DOORS Database Window 189 (1)
Formal Modules 189 (3)
Objects 192 (3)
Pictures 195 (1)
Tables 196 (1)
History and Version Control 196 (2)
History 196 (1)
Baselining 197 (1)
Attributes and Views 198 (1)
Attributes 198 (1)
Views 199 (1)
Traceability 199 (3)
Links 199 (1)
Traceability Reports 200 (2)
Import and Export 202 (2)
Summary 204 (1)
Bibliography 205 (4)
Index 209