Network Analysis, Architecture and Design (Morgan Kaufmann Series in Networking) (2ND)

Network Analysis, Architecture and Design (Morgan Kaufmann Series in Networking) (2ND)

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  • 製本 Hardcover:ハードカバー版/ページ数 450 p.
  • 言語 ENG,ENG
  • 商品コード 9781558608870
  • DDC分類 004.65

Full Description


The landscape of networking has changed so that network services have now become one of the most important factors to the success of many third generation networks. It has become an important feature of the designer's job to define the problems that exist in his network, choose and analyze several optimization parameters during the analysis process, and then prioritize and evaluate these parameters in the architecture and design of the system. "Network Analysis, Architecture, and Design, 2e", uses a systems methodology approach to teaching these concepts, which views the network (and the environment it impacts) as part of the larger system, looking at interactions and dependencies between the network and its users, applications, and devices. This approach matches the new business climate where customers drive the development of new services and the book discusses how networks can be architected and designed to provide many different types of services to customers. This second edition contains an entirely new focus on network architecture, which completes the process from analysis to design. Network architecture takes the input from network analysis and provides a high-level view of the network, focusing on the relationships between major functions of the network, such as security, network management, performance and addressing and routing. A reference architecture, outlining how these functions are to be addressed within the network, serves as the foundation for the network design. With a number of examples, analogies, instructor tips, and exercises, this book works through the processes of analysis, architecture, and design step by step, giving network designers a solid resource for making good design decisions. It is a substantial revision of the very popular first edition - "Practical Computer Network Analysis and Design" - by a seasoned network architect who has led numerous design projects in government, commercial, and academic spaces. Effective examples, case studies, worksheets, and end-of-chapter exercises provide professionals and students with the necessary tools for learning important design issues. It shows how to architect and design a network to provide the desired services and performance levels, and to choose the appropriate network technologies and interconnection strategies to meet architectural and design goals. Instructors can download the solutions to the exercises in the book by clicking on the "Instructors" resource link in the upper right corner of the screen and searching for author "McCabe."

Table of Contents

    Introduction
Objectives 1 (1)
Preparation 1 (1)
Background 2 (2)
Overview of Analysis, Architecture, and 4 (15)
Design Processes
Hierarchy and Interconnectivity 7 (1)
Importance of Network Analysis 8 (8)
Model for Network Analysis, 16 (3)
Architecture, and Design
A Systems Methodology 19 (1)
System Description 20 (5)
Service Description 25 (1)
Service Characteristics 26 (15)
Service Levels 28 (2)
System Components and Network Services 30 (3)
Service Requests and Requirements 33 (4)
Service Offerings 37 (2)
Service Metrics 39 (2)
Performance Characteristics 41 (4)
Capacity 41 (1)
Delay 42 (1)
RMA 42 (2)
Performance Envelopes 44 (1)
Network Supportability 45 (2)
Conclusion 47 (1)
Exercises 48 (5)
Requirements Analysis: Concepts
Objectives 53 (1)
Preparation 53 (1)
Background 54 (4)
Requirements and Features 54 (2)
The Need for Requirements Analysis 56 (2)
User Requirements 58 (4)
Application Requirements 62 (9)
Application Types 62 (6)
Application Groups 68 (2)
Application Locations 70 (1)
Device Requirements 71 (7)
Device Types 72 (2)
Performance Characteristics 74 (2)
Device Locations 76 (2)
Network Requirements 78 (5)
Existing Networks and Migration 78 (2)
Network Management and Security 80 (3)
Other Requirements 83 (2)
Supplemental Performance Requirements 83 (1)
Financial Requirements 84 (1)
Enterprise Requirements 85 (1)
The Requirements Specification and Map 85 (4)
Conclusion 89 (1)
Exercises 90 (5)
Requirements Analysis: Process
Objectives 95 (1)
Preparation 95 (1)
Gathering and Listing Requirements 96 (9)
Determining Initial Conditions 96 (4)
Setting Customer Expectations 100(1)
Working with Users 100(2)
Taking Performance Measurements 102(1)
Tracking and Managing Requirements 103(1)
Mapping Location Information 104(1)
Developing Service Metrics 105(3)
Measurement Tools 107(1)
Where to Apply Service Metrics 108(1)
Characterizing Behavior 108(5)
Modeling and Simulation 109(1)
User Behavior 110(2)
Application Behavior 112(1)
Developing RMA Requirements 113(8)
Reliability 113(1)
Maintainability 113(1)
Availability 114(5)
Thresholds and Limits 119(2)
Developing Delay Requirements 121(5)
End-to-End and Round-Trip Delays 124(1)
Delay Variation 125(1)
Developing Capacity Requirements 126(3)
Estimating Data Rates 126(3)
Developing Supplemental Performance 129(11)
Requirements
Operational Suitability 130(1)
Supportability 130(8)
Confidence 138(2)
Environment-Specific Thresholds and Limits 140(3)
Comparing Application Requirements 141(2)
Requirements for Predictable and 143(2)
Guaranteed Performance
Requirements for Predictable Performance 143(1)
Requirements for Guaranteed Performance 144(1)
Requirements Mapping 145(1)
Developing the Requirements Specification 146(2)
Conclusion 148(3)
Exercises 151(6)
Flow Analysis
Objectives 157(1)
Preparation 158(1)
Background 158(1)
Flows 158(6)
Individual and Composite Flows 161(2)
Critical Flows 163(1)
Identifying and Developing Flows 164(7)
Focusing on a Particular Application 165(4)
Developing a Profile 169(1)
Choosing the Top N Applications 170(1)
Data Sources and Sinks 171(6)
Flow Models 177(12)
Peer-to-Peer 178(2)
Client-Server 180(2)
Hierarchical Client-Server 182(4)
Distributed Computing 186(3)
Flow Prioritization 189(2)
The Flow Specification 191(4)
Flowspec Algorithm 192(3)
Capacity and Service Planning 195(1)
Example Application of Flow Analysis 195(7)
Conclusion 202(3)
Exercises 205(4)
Network Architecture
Objectives 209(1)
Preparation 209(1)
Background 210(4)
Architecture and Design 211(3)
Component Architectures 214(11)
Addressing/Routing Component 219(2)
Architecture
Network Management Component 221(1)
Architecture
Performance Component Architecture 222(1)
Security Component Architecture 223(1)
Optimizing Component Architectures 224(1)
Reference Architecture 225(4)
External Relationships 227(1)
Optimizing the Reference Architecture 228(1)
Architectural Models 229(14)
Topological Models 231(2)
Flow-Based Models 233(2)
Functional Models 235(2)
Using the Architectural Models 237(6)
Systems and Network Architectures 243(1)
Conclusion 244(1)
Exercises 245(2)
Addressing and Routing Architecture
Objectives 247(1)
Preparation 247(1)
Background 248(7)
Addressing Fundamentals 249(2)
Routing Fundamentals 251(4)
Addressing Mechanisms 255(13)
Classful Addressing 255(3)
Subnetting 258(2)
Variable-Length Subnetting 260(2)
Supernetting 262(5)
Private Addressing and NAT 267(1)
Routing Mechanisms 268(9)
Establishing Routing Flows 268(1)
Identifying and Classifying Routing 269(3)
Boundaries
Manipulating Routing Flows 272(5)
Addressing Strategies 277(3)
Routing Strategies 280(10)
Evaluating Routing Protocols 282(4)
Choosing and Applying Routing Protocols 286(4)
Architectural Considerations 290(2)
Internal Relationships 290(1)
External Relationships 290(2)
Conclusion 292(1)
Exercises 292(5)
Network Management Architecture
Objectives 297(1)
Preparation 297(1)
Background 298(1)
Defining Network Management 299(3)
Network Devices and Characteristics 301(1)
Network Management Mechanisms 302(7)
Monitoring Mechanisms 302(4)
Instrumentation Mechanisms 306(2)
Configuration Mechanisms 308(1)
Architectural Considerations 309(17)
In-Band and Out-of-Band Management 310(3)
Centralized, Distributed, and 313(3)
Hierarchical Management
Scaling of Network Management Traffic 316(1)
Checks and Balances 317(1)
Management of Network Management Data 318(2)
MIB Selection 320(1)
Integration into OSS 321(1)
Internal Relationships 322(3)
External Relationships 325(1)
Conclusion 326(1)
Exercises 327(4)
Performance Architecture
Objectives 331(1)
Preparation 331(1)
Background 332(1)
Developing Goals for Performance 333(3)
Performance Mechanisms 336(14)
Quality of Service 336(4)
Prioritization, Traffic Management, 340(6)
Scheduling, and Queuing
Service-Level Agreements 346(2)
Policies 348(2)
Architectural Considerations 350(3)
Evaluation of Performance Mechanisms 350(2)
Internal Relationships 352(1)
External Relationships 352(1)
Conclusion 353(1)
Exercises 354(3)
Security and Privacy Architecture
Objectives 357(1)
Preparation 357(1)
Background 358(1)
Developing a Security and Privacy Plan 359(1)
Security and Privacy Administration 360(5)
Threat Analysis 360(3)
Policies and Procedures 363(2)
Security and Privacy Mechanisms 365(10)
Physical Security and Awareness 366(1)
Protocol and Application Security 367(2)
Encryption/Decryption 369(2)
Network Perimeter Security 371(1)
Remote Access Security 372(3)
Architectural Considerations 375(5)
Evaluation of Security Mechanisms 375(3)
Internal Relationships 378(1)
External Relationships 379(1)
Conclusion 380(1)
Exercises 381(4)
Selecting Technologies for the Network
Design
Objectives 385(1)
Preparation 385(1)
Background 386(1)
Developing Goals for the Network Design 387(5)
Developing Criteria for Technology 392(14)
Evaluation
Broadcast and Nonbroadcast 394(6)
Multiple-Access Methods
Technology Functions and Features 400(2)
Performance Upgrade Paths 402(3)
Flow Considerations 405(1)
Guidelines and Constraints on Technology 406(6)
Evaluations
Constraints on Candidate Technologies 411(1)
Making Technology Choices for the Network 412(9)
Design
Segmenting the Network 413(5)
Isolating Areas--The Black-Box Method 418(2)
Applying Evaluation Criteria and 420(1)
Guidelines
Conclusion 421(1)
Exercises 421(4)
Interconnecting Technologies within the
Network Design
Objectives 425(1)
Preparation 425(1)
Background 426(3)
Shared Medium (No Interconnection) 429(2)
Switching 431(12)
ATM Switching 434(9)
Routing 443(2)
Hybrid Mechanisms 445(4)
NHRP 445(1)
MPOA 446(1)
Service Switching 447(2)
Applying Interconnection Mechanisms to 449(4)
the Design
Hierarchy 449(1)
Redundancy 450(3)
Where to Go from Here 453(1)
Conclusion 454(1)
Exercises 455(4)
Glossary of Terms 459(20)
Glossary of Acronyms 479(12)
Index 491