Seeing God Everywhere : Essays on Nature and the Sacred (Perennial Philosophy)

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Seeing God Everywhere : Essays on Nature and the Sacred (Perennial Philosophy)

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  • 製本 Paperback:紙装版/ペーパーバック版/ページ数 336 p.
  • 言語 ENG
  • 商品コード 9780941532426
  • DDC分類 291.24

Full Description


This collection of essays on the relationship between nature and the sacred reflects the thoughts of some of the most important religious authorities and scholars from Buddhist, Christian, Islamic, Jewish and Native American traditions. Covering subjects ranging from flower viewing in Japan to the spiritual dimension of the environmental crisis, some of these articles are simple and poetic meditations while others are richly layered metaphysical studies concerning the divine root of creation. Following each essay is a short poem, drawn from various traditions of spiritual poetry, echoing the underlying theme of the book. The most important and urgent message of this anthology is that our current environmental crisis results from a loss of spiritual centre and that the physical world cannot be separated from the metaphysical without suffering potentially disastrous consequences. Its fundamental thesis is that our continuing physical and spiritual well-being is ultimately linked to our ability to "see God everywhere" and to "remember Him in all things."Whether this view is theistic, according to Western and Native American traditions, or none theistic, according to the Buddhist perspective, all of the essays in this collection underline our need to recognise and embrace the interdependence of all things in the unity of the Real and to extend our definition of the spiritual into the ecological. This vision of the immanence of God in nature is the most radical of all ecological perspectives because it points to the Origin of all that is.