Power System Operations and Electricity Markets (Electric Power Engineering Series)

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Power System Operations and Electricity Markets (Electric Power Engineering Series)

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  • 製本 Hardcover:ハードカバー版/ページ数 134 p.
  • 言語 ENG,ENG
  • 商品コード 9780849308130
  • DDC分類 333.79320973

Full Description


The electric power industry in the U.S. has undergone dramatic changes in recent years. Tight regulations enacted in the 1970's and then de-regulation in the 90's have transformed it from a technology-driven industry into one driven by public policy requirements and the open-access market. Now, just as the utility companies must change to ensure their survival, engineers and other professionals in the industry must acquire new skills, adopt new attitudes, and accommodate other disciplines. Power System Operations and Electricity Markets provides the information engineers need to understand and meet the challenges of the new competitive environment. Integrating the business and technical aspects of the restructured power industry, it explains, clearly and succinctly, how new methods for power systems operations and energy marketing relate to public policy, regulation, economics, and engineering science. The authors examine the technologies and techniques currently in use and lay the groundwork for the coming era of unbundling, open access, power marketing, self-generation, and regional transmission operations.The rapid, massive changes in the electric power industry and in the economy have rendered most books on the subject obsolete. Based on the authors' years of front-line experience in the industry and in regulatory organizations, Power System Operations and Electricity Markets is current, insightful, and complete with Web links that will help readers stay up to date.

Table of Contents

  The evolution of the electric power industry     1  (20)
Energy conservation in the pre-energy 1 (3)
crises environment
The energy crisis and its impact on the 4 (17)
electric power industry
Economic factors influencing the electric 4 (4)
power industry
Technological factors influencing the 8 (2)
electric power industry
Public policy factors influencing the 10 (1)
electric power industry
Federal public policy initiatives 11 (5)
State public policy initiatives 16 (5)
Restructuring and the transition to more 21 (14)
competitive power markets
The fundamentals and terminology of power 21 (3)
industry change
Historic and future structure of the 24 (2)
electric power industry
The mechanics of restructuring power markets 26 (9)
Unbundling the utility system 26 (1)
Transmission independence 27 (3)
Market equilibrium and trading regimes 30 (5)
The first major challenges to the system: the 35 (12)
California restructuring experience
Introduction 35 (1)
Background on the creation of the 36 (3)
competitive California market
The capacity availability dilemma 39 (4)
Thin market generation ownership 42 (1)
Transactional limitations for buyers and 43 (1)
sellers
Failure of analysis 44 (2)
Conclusions 46 (1)
Power marketers in a restructured power 47 (12)
industry
Introduction 47 (1)
What is a power marketer? 47 (1)
Opening the door to power marketers 48 (1)
Who are power marketers? 49 (1)
The power markets 50 (2)
Services offered by power marketers 52 (4)
Risk management 53 (1)
Hedging 53 (1)
Basis contracts 53 (1)
Options 54 (1)
Put option 54 (1)
Call option 54 (1)
No-cost collar 54 (1)
Price swaps 55 (1)
Facilities management 56 (1)
Total energy services 56 (1)
Tolling services 56 (1)
Conclusion 56 (3)
The role of distributed energy resources in a 59 (10)
restructured power industry
Introduction 59 (1)
A definition of DER 60 (2)
UDC disincentives associated with 62 (2)
developing DER applications
Interconnection issues 64 (1)
Rate design issues 65 (2)
Wheeling power at the distribution level 67 (1)
Conclusions 68 (1)
Independent power generation 69 (16)
Introduction 69 (2)
The origins of competitive wholesale markets 71 (4)
Who are independent power developers? 75 (2)
Analyzing the investment opportunity 77 (1)
Transmission issues associated with IPP 78 (4)
development
Conclusions 82 (3)
Understanding both technical and business 85 (6)
factors
A brief history 85 (1)
The current situation 86 (1)
Industry standards relating to electrical 86 (2)
safety
NERC reliability practices and standards 88 (2)
Laws and regulations relating to 90 (1)
competition and open access
The business environment and NERC business 90 (1)
practice standards
End-of-chapter questions 90 (1)
The North American bulk electric system 91 (4)
The evolution of system operations and 91 (2)
control
The big machines 93 (1)
End-of-chapter questions 94 (1)
Methods for economically operating a power 95 (4)
system
Operating economics control systems and 95 (1)
power systems reliability
A single generating unit 95 (1)
Two generating units 96 (1)
End-of-chapter questions 97 (2)
Power generation control 99 (4)
The definition of automatic generation 99 (1)
control
Changing automatic generation control 100(1)
objectives
Control performance criteria 101(1)
End-of-chapter questions 102(1)
New reliability and control concepts 103(4)
The layman s definition of reliability 103(1)
The academic and traditional definitions of 103(1)
reliability
North American Electric Reliability Council 104(1)
reliability definitions
Traditional power system operations in 104(1)
control areas
The new paradigm: operating and service 105(1)
functions
End-of-chapter questions 106(1)
Available transfer capability 107(4)
A new methodology for assessing 107(2)
transmission line Limitations
Guiding principles for ATC calculations 109(1)
End-of-chapter questions 109(2)
Network congestion and transmission loading 111(6)
relief
The network congestion problem 111(1)
The transmission loading relief approach 111(2)
Criticisms of the TLR approach 113(1)
Network congestion data 114(1)
End-of-chapter questions 114(3)
The use of power flow and stability analysis 117(2)
tools
Operating security limit (OSL) violations 117(1)
Tools for determining OSL violations 117(1)
End-of-chapter questions 118(1)
Technology needs for the electric power 119(8)
industry
Opportunities and threats 119(1)
Lessons from the past 119(1)
An overview of the problem 120(4)
Summary 124(1)
End-of-chapter questions 124(3)
Index 127