Democracy Delayed : The Case of Castro's Cuba

個数:

Democracy Delayed : The Case of Castro's Cuba

  • 在庫がございません。海外の書籍取次会社を通じて出版社等からお取り寄せいたします。
    通常6~9週間ほどで発送の見込みですが、商品によってはさらに時間がかかることもございます。
    重要ご説明事項
    1. 納期遅延や、ご入手不能となる場合がございます。
    2. 複数冊ご注文の場合、分割発送となる場合がございます。
    3. 美品のご指定は承りかねます。
  • 【重要:入荷遅延について】
    ウクライナ情勢悪化・新型コロナウィルス感染拡大により、洋書・洋古書の入荷が不安定になっています。詳しくはこちらをご確認ください。
    海外からのお取り寄せの場合、弊社サイト内で表示している標準的な納期よりもお届けまでに日数がかかる見込みでございます。
    申し訳ございませんが、あらかじめご了承くださいますようお願い申し上げます。
  • ◆画像の表紙や帯等は実物とは異なる場合があります。
  • 製本 Hardcover:ハードカバー版/ページ数 272 p.
  • 言語 ENG
  • 商品コード 9780801870460
  • DDC分類 320.97291

基本説明

Offers a searching and detailed analysis of the factors behind Cuba's failure to liberalize.

Full Description

With the dissolution of the Soviet Union, foreign policy analysts and international relations scholars expected communist Cuba to undergo transitions to democracy and to markets as had the Eastern European nations of the former Soviet bloc. But more than a decade after the fall of the Berlin Wall, Castro remains in power, with no sign that the Cuban government or economy is moving toward liberalization. In Democracy Delayed, political scientist Juan Lopez offers a searching and detailed analysis of the factors behind Cuba's failure to liberalize. Lopez begins by comparing the political systems of three Eastern European states-the former German Democratic Republic, Czechoslovakia, and Romania-with that of Cuba, in order to identify the differences that have allowed Castro to maintain his hold over the government and the economy. Lopez also shows the various conditions promoting change, including the development of civil society groups in Cuba, and discusses why some U.S. policies help the possibility of democratization in Cuba while others hinder it.
While the Catholic Church in Poland and the Protestant Church in East Germany fostered change, the Catholic Church in Cuba has not taken a defiant stance against authoritarianism but seems instead to be biding its time until Castro is out of the picture. In conclusion, Lopez argues that a political transition in Cuba is possible even under the government of Fidel Castro. Some necessary conditions have been missing, but it is possible that U.S. policies could lay the groundwork for democratic charge.

Contents

Contents: Preface and Acknowledgements Introduction 1. The Castro Regime and Political Transition 2. Civil Society and Repression 3. Political Efficacy and Independent Communication 4. Assistance to Civil Society 5. U.S. Policies toward CubaThe Economic EmbargoConclusionsNotes References Index