The State of Working America, 2002/2003 (State of Working America)

The State of Working America, 2002/2003 (State of Working America)

  • ただいまウェブストアではご注文を受け付けておりません。 ⇒古書を探す
  • 製本 Paperback:紙装版/ペーパーバック版/ページ数 480 p.
  • 言語 ENG,ENG
  • 商品コード 9780801488030
  • DDC分類 330

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments                                    xi
Executive Summary 3 (10)
Introduction: What kind of recovery? 13 (16)
Documentation and Methodology 29 (4)
Family Income: full employment reverses 33 (80)
historic stagnation
Median income: slow recovery, then strong 35 (5)
gains
Latter 1990s pay off for less-advantaged 40 (3)
family types
An income `generation gap' 43 (5)
Strong growth among dual-earner couples 48 (3)
and single mothers
Growing inequality of family income 51 (5)
Counterarguments to the evidence on 56 (27)
income trends
Are taxes the reason for rising 58 (10)
inequality and disappointing growth in
family incomes?
Is the increase in inequality sensitive 68 (7)
to income definitions?
The role of mobility and demographics 75 (8)
Growth in inequality narrows pathways to 83 (3)
prosperity
Expanding capital incomes 86 (8)
The impact of low unemployment on family 94 (3)
income growth
The `time crunch': married-couple 97 (16)
families with children working harder
than ever
Wages: broad-based gains in late 1990s 113(104)
Contrasting hours and hourly wage growth 116(3)
Contrasting compensation and wage growth 119(2)
Wages by occupation 121(6)
Wage trends by wage level 127(6)
Shifts in low-wage jobs 133(8)
Trends in benefit growth and inequality 141(7)
Explaining wage inequality 148(8)
Productivity and the 156(2)
compensation/productivity gap
Rising education/wage differentials 158(5)
Young workers' wages 163(2)
The importance of within-group wage 165(5)
inequality
Wage growth by race and ethnicity 170(1)
The gender wage gap 171(1)
Unemployment and wage growth 172(4)
The shift to low-paying industries 176(5)
Trade and wages 181(8)
The union dimension 189(7)
An eroded minimum wage 196(7)
The technology story of wage inequality 203(10)
Executive pay soars 213(4)
Jobs: recession leads to employment losses 217(60)
Unemployment 218(9)
Unemployment and the earnings 225(2)
distribution
Employment 227(11)
Work hours 238(5)
Benefits 243(7)
Nonstandard work 250(12)
Part-time work 259(2)
Temping 261(1)
Self-employment 261(1)
Job stability and job security 262(15)
Declining job stability 264(6)
Displacement 270(3)
Job security 273(4)
Wealth: deeper in debt 277(32)
Net worth 278(7)
Racial divide 283(1)
Low net worth 284(1)
Assets 285(9)
Stocks 286(3)
Home ownership 289(3)
Retirement wealth and income adequacy 292(2)
Liabilities 294(15)
Debt service 298(2)
Hardship 300(2)
Student loans 302(7)
Poverty: historic progress, but high rates 309(48)
persist
The course and composition of poverty, 311(8)
1959-2000
Alternative approaches to measuring 319(11)
poverty
What's wrong with the current poverty 319(11)
measure?
Poverty, growth, and the inequality wedge 330(12)
The impact of demographic change 333(5)
The changing effects of taxes and 338(4)
transfers
Work and poverty: the policy thrust of 342(8)
the 1990s
Poverty and the low-wage labor market 350(7)
Regional Analysis: significant variation 357(38)
among the states
Income 358(8)
Labor markets 366(19)
Poverty and low-wage shares 385(10)
International Comparisons: more inequality, 395(38)
less mobility out of poverty
Incomes and productivity: U.S. lead 396(7)
narrows
Workers' wages and compensation: unequal 403(6)
growth
Household income: unequal growth 409(5)
Poverty: deeper and more enduring in the 414(8)
United States
Employment and hours worked: problems 422(8)
with the U.S. model
Evaluating the U.S. model 430(3)
Appendix A: The family income data series 433(6)
Appendix B: Wage analysis computations 439(8)
Table notes 447(18)
Figure notes 465(8)
Bibliography 473(10)
Index 483(10)
About EPI 493(1)
About the authors 494