William Cecil and Episcopacy, 1559-1577 (St Andrews Studies in Reformation History)

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William Cecil and Episcopacy, 1559-1577 (St Andrews Studies in Reformation History)

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  • 製本 Hardcover:ハードカバー版/ページ数 250 p.
  • 言語 ENG
  • 商品コード 9780754608349
  • DDC分類 262.1234209031

Full Description


The figure of William Cecil dominates the court of Elizabeth I, and next to the queen herself, no one did more to shape the political, religious and economic landscape of late sixteenth century England. Nowhere is this influence more evident than in the ecclesiastical settlements that Elizabeth imposed on a country wracked by religious divisions and uncertainty. At the very heart of this settlement lay the question of the role of the bishops, and it is to this problem that Cecil was to devote much time and energy. Broadening our understanding of the Elizabethan Church, this study utilises a number of hitherto underused primary sources to re-examine the vexed issue of the role of bishops. It addresses the question of why certain men were appointed bishops whilst others, often seemingly better qualified, were passed over. Taking a broadly chronological approach, this book argues that Cecil, a committed protestant, hoped to remodel espiscopacy along 'reformed' continental lines. Rather than great princes of the church, Cecil envisaged 'superintendents' shorn of much of their traditional temporal power and wealth. Charting the first two decades of Elizabeth's reign it is shown how Cecil tried to convince the queen to abandon the established economic foundations of 'prelacy' in favour of a properly funded superintendency. In this he failed. Yet as long as Cecil remained a dominating voice at the council table the Church of England, through the mediation of a bench of conscientious and hard-working (if often hard-pressed) bishops, was assured of a broad base and an evangelical future. The remainder of Cecil's career, from 1577 to 1598, will be dealt with in a subsequent volume Lord Burghley and Episcopacy.

Table of Contents

Preface and acknowledgements                       xi
List of abbreviations xvii
1. Introduction 1 Historiographical debates 1 (10)
Cecil's memoranda of 1559 7 (4)
2. 1559: Policies and personalities 11 (14)
The parliamentary settlement 11 (2)
The Act of Exchange 13 (4)
Elizabeth, the Marian hierarchy and the 17 (2)
reformers
Cecil and the Edwardian hierarchy 19 (6)
3. The drive towards reform 25 (8)
The aftermath of parliament 25 (1)
The July List 26 (7)
4. Saving the settlement: July-December 1559 33 (24)
The July refusals 33 (2)
A triple crisis: exchange, consecration and 35 (9)
crucifixes
The October List and its aftermath 44 (8)
December 1559: further concessions 52 (5)
5. Cecil deflected: March 1560-March 1562 57 (12)
Parkhurst and Alley 57 (2)
The emergence of Robert Dudley 59 (6)
Dudley and Cecil 65 (4)
6. The bishops and the exchequer, 1560-62 69 (22)
Bills of restitution 69 (2)
Exeunt sureties 71 (6)
A royal warrant 77 (4)
Exchanges concluded 81 (3)
Northumberland's rapacious ghost 84 (4)
Fiscal conciliation and Lord Robert 88 (3)
7. Cecil revised: 1562-70 91 (14)
The lean years 91 (4)
Releaguered bishops 95 (3)
Watching and waiting 98 (2)
Fiscal conciliation refined 100 (2)
The vestiarian controversy 102 (3)
8. The aftermath of rebellion, 1569-73 105 (22)
'National government' 105 (2)
The replenishment of the bench, 1570-73 107 (16)
Fiscal conciliation perfected 123 (4)
9. Contrary winds, 1570-76 127 (26)
The bishops and the prophesyings 127 (4)
Parker, conformity and the rise of 131 (4)
Christopher Hatton
The Hattonian reaction 135 (8)
Fiscal conciliation in jeopardy 143 (6)
The fall of Grindal revisited 149 (4)
10. The bishop in his diocese, 1560-76 153 (24)
Clerical tax collection 153 (3)
Arrearages: the Manan subsidy 156 (3)
Episcopal leases 159 (11)
The quest for concealments 170 (4)
Appendix: episcopal leases granted to the 174 (3)
Crown, 1568-76
11. Interim conclusions 177 (48)
'Elizabeth the avaricious' 177 (4)
The glittering brooch 181 (6)
Appendix I The bishops and the exchequer 187 (30)
1559-77
Appendix II Revenues of the Crown sede 217 (8)
vacante and from first-fruits November
1558-December 1578
Select bibliography 225 (6)
Index 231