Dust Explosions in the Process Industries (3TH)

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Dust Explosions in the Process Industries (3TH)

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  • 製本 Hardcover:ハードカバー版/ページ数 700 p.
  • 言語 ENG,ENG
  • 商品コード 9780750676021
  • DDC分類 604.7

Full Description


Unfortunately, dust explosions are common and costly in a wide array of industries such as petrochemical, food, paper and pharmaceutical. It is imperative that practical and theoretical knowledge of the origin, development, prevention and mitigation of dust explosions is imparted to the responsible safety manager. The material in this book offers an up to date evaluation of prevalent activities, testing methods, design measures and safe operating techniques. Also provided is a detailed and comprehensive critique of all the significant phases relating to the hazard and control of a dust explosion. An invaluable reference work for industry, safety consultants and students.

Table of Contents

Foreword                                           xvii
Prefaces xix
1 Dust Explosions-Origin, Propagation, 1 (156)
Prevention, and Mitigation: An Overview
1.1 The nature of dust explosions 1 (19)
1.1.1 The phenomenon 1 (4)
1.1.2 Materials that can cause dust 5 (2)
explosions
1.1.3 Explosible range of dust 7 (3)
concentrations-primary and secondary
explosions
1.1.4 Ignition sources 10 (10)
1.2 Significance of the dust explosion 20 (5)
hazard: statistical records
1.2.1 Recording dust explosions, an 20 (1)
activity of long traditions
1.2.2 Dust explosions in the United States, 21 (1)
1900-1956
1.2.3 Dust explosions in the Federal 22 (3)
Republic of Germany, 1965-1985
1.2.4 Recent statistics of grain dust 25 (1)
explosions in the United States
1.3 Dust and dust cloud properties that 25 (32)
influence ignitability and explosion violence
1.3.1 Dust chemistry, including moisture 25 (4)
1.3.2 Particle size or specific surface area 29 (3)
1.3.3 Degree of dust dispersion effective 32 (2)
particle size
1.3.4 Dust concentration 34 (2)
1.3.5 Turbulence 36 (3)
1.3.6 Oxygen content of oxidizer gas 39 (5)
1.3.7 Initial temperature of the dust cloud 44 (6)
1.3.8 Initial pressure of a dust cloud 47
1.3.9 Combustible gas or vapor mixed with a 50 (5)
dust cloud ("Hybrid" mixtures)
1.3.10 Inerting by mixing inert dust with 55 (1)
combustible dust
1.3.11 Concluding remarks 56 (1)
1.4 Means for preventing and mitigating dust 57 (64)
explosions
1.4.1 The means available: an overview 57 (1)
1.4.2 Preventing ignition sources 57 (10)
1.4.3 Preventing explosible dust clouds 67 (6)
1.4.4 Preventing explosion transfer between 73 (8)
process units via pipes and ducts:
explosion isolation
1.4.5 Explosion-pressure-resistant equipment 81 (3)
1.4.6 Explosion venting 84 (17)
1.4.7 Automatic suppression of dust 101 (4)
explosions
1.4.8 Control and interlocking systems to 105 (7)
prevent and mitigate dust explosions in
integrated process plants
1.4.9 Prevention and removal of dust 112 (1)
accumulations outside process equipment:
good housekeeping
1.4.10 Dust control by the addition of 113 (3)
liquid
1.4.11 Construction and layout of buildings 116 (2)
1.4.12 The "human factors" 118 (3)
1.5 Selecting appropriate means for 121 (36)
preventing and mitigating dust explosions
1.5.1 Basic philosophy, cost estimation, 121 (6)
and risk analysis
1.5.2 Selection scheme suggested by Noha 127 (6)
for the chemical process industry
1.5.3 Special aspects for some specific 133 (8)
groups of powders and dusts: a brief
literature survey
1.5.4 Standards, recommendations, and 141 (16)
guidelines
2 Case Histories 157 (42)
2.1 Introduction 157 (1)
2.2 The explosion in a flour warehouse in 157 (3)
Turin on December 14, 1785
2.3 Grain dust explosions in Norway 160 (6)
2.3.1 Wheat grain dust, Stavanger Port 160 (2)
Silo, June 1970
2.3.2 Wheat grain dust, new part of 162 (1)
Stavanger Port Silo, October 1988
2.3.3 Grain dust (barley/oats), head house 163 (2)
of the silo plant at Kambo, June 1976
2.3.4 Malted barley dust, Oslo Port Silo, 165 (1)
July 1976
2.3.5 Malted barley dust, Oslo Port Silo, 165 (1)
June 1987
2.4 Four grain dust explosions in United 166 (7)
States, 1980-1981 (Source: Kauffman and
Hubbard, 1984)
2.4.1 Inland grain terminal at St. Joseph, 166 (2)
Missouri, April 1980
2.4.2 River grain terminal at St. Paul, 168 (1)
Minnesota, June 10, 1980
2.4.3 Train-loading country grain terminal 169 (2)
at Fonda, Iowa, July 15, 1980
2.4.4 Large export grain silo plant at 171 (2)
Corpus Christi, Texas, April 1981
2.5 A dust explosion in a fish meal factory 173 (4)
in Norway in 1975
2.6 Smoldering gas explosion in a silo plant 177 (1)
in Stavanger, Norway, in November 1985
2.7 Smoldering gas explosions in a large 178 (3)
storage facility for grain and feedstuffs in
Tomylovo, Knibyshev Region, USSR
2.8 Smoldering gas explosion and subsequent 181 (1)
successful extinction of smoldering
combustion in pelletized wheat bran in a silo
cell at Nord Mills, Malm  Sweden, in 1989
2.9 Linen flax dust explosion in Harbin Linen 182 (5)
Textile Plant, Peoples Republic of China, in
March 1987
2.9.1 General outline 182 (2)
2.9.2 Explosion initiation and development, 184 (2)
Scenario 1
2.9.3 Explosion initiation and development, 186 (1)
Scenario 2
2.9.4 Additional remarks 187 (1)
2.10 Fires and explosions in coal dust plants 187 (3)
2.10.1 Methane explosion in 17,000 m3 coal 187 (1)
silo at Elkford, British Columbia, Canada,
in 1982
2.10.2 Methane/coal dust explosion in a 188 (1)
coal storage silo at a cement works in San
Bernardino County, California
2.10.3 Gas and dust explosion in a 189 (1)
pulverized coal production/combustion plant
in a cement factory in Lagerdorf, Federal
Republic of Germany, in October 1980
2.10.4 Further explosion and fire incidents 189 (1)
involving coal
2.11 Dust explosion in a silicon powder 190 (2)
grinding plant at Bremanger, Norway, in 1972
2.12 Two devastating aluminum dust explosions 192 (7)
2.12.1 Mixing section of premix plant of 192 (3)
slurry explosive factory at Gullaug,
Norway, in 1973
2.12.2 Atomized aluminum powder production 195 (4)
plant at Anglesey, United Kingdom, in 1983
3 Generation of Explosible Dust Clouds by 199 (52)
Reentrainment and Redispersion of Deposited
Dust in Air
3.1 Background 199 (1)
3.2 Structure of the problem 200 (2)
3.3 Attraction forces between particles in 202 (4)
powder or dust deposits
3.3.1 Van der Waals forces 202 (1)
3.3.2 Electrostatic forces 203 (1)
3.3.3 Interparticle forces due to liquids 204 (2)
3.4 Relationship between interparticle 206 (7)
attraction forces and strength of bulk powder
3.4.1 Theories 206 (2)
3.4.2 Measurement of the mechanical 208 (5)
strength of cohesive bulk powders and dusts
3.5 Dynamics of particles suspended in a gas 213 (8)
3.5.1 Terminal settling velocity of a 213 (2)
particle in the gravitational field
3.5.2 Drag on a particle in general 215 (3)
3.5.3 Movement of a particle in an 218 (1)
arbitrary flow
3.5.4 Speed of sound in a dust cloud 219 (2)
3.5.5 Propagation of large-amplitude 221 (1)
pressure waves in dust clouds
3.6 Dislodgement of dust particles from a 221 (11)
dust or powder deposit by interaction with an
airflow
3.6.1 Airflow parallel to a monolayer of 221 (3)
particles on a plane, smooth surface
3.6.2 Airflow parallel to the surface of a 224 (6)
powder or dust deposit
3.6.3 Entrainment of particles by an upward 230 (2)
airflow through a particle bed
3.7 Dispersion of agglomerates of cohesive 232 (2)
particles suspended in a gas by flow through
a narrow nozzle
3.8 Diffusion of dust particles in a 234 (5)
turbulent gas flow
3.9 Methods for generating experimental dust 239 (12)
clouds for dust explosion research
3.9.1 Background 239 (1)
3.9.2 Transient dust clouds generated by a 240 (4)
short air blast
3.9.3 Stationary dust cloud in a closed 244 (1)
circulation system
3.9.4 Stationary dust cloud in an 244 (2)
open-circuit system
3.9.5 Conclusion 246 (5)
4 Propagation of Flames in Dust Clouds 251 (134)
4.1 Ignition and combustion of single 251 (14)
particles
4.1.1 Aluminum 251 (2)
4.1.2 Magnesium 253 (2)
4.1.3 Zirconium 255 (1)
4.1.4 Carbon and coal 256 (8)
4.1.5 Wood 264 (1)
4.2 Laminar dust flames 265 (53)
4.2.1 Laminar flame propagation in 265 (3)
premixed, quiescent gases
4.2.2 Differences between flames in 268 (2)
premixed gas and in dust clouds
4.2.3 Experimental burning velocities, 270 (13)
flame thicknesses, quenching distances, and
temperatures of laminar dust flames
4.2.4 Theories of one-dimensional laminar 283 (11)
flame propagation in dust clouds
4.2.5 Theories of laminar flame propagation 294 (9)
in closed vessels
4.2.6 Minimum and maximum explosible dust 303 (15)
concentrations
4.3 Nonlaminar dust flame propagation 318 (7)
phenomena in vertical ducts
4.4 Turbulent flame propagation 325 (42)
4.4.1 Turbulence and turbulence models 325 (5)
4.4.2 Turbulent dust flames: an 330 (2)
introductory overview
4.4.3 Experimental studies of turbulent 332 (9)
dust flames in closed vessels
4.4.4 Turbulent flame propagation in partly 341 (3)
or fully unconfined geometries
4.4.5 Systematic comparative studies of 344 (2)
turbulent gas and dust explosions
4.4.6 Maximum experimental safe gap for 346 (5)
dust clouds
4.4.7 Acceleration of turbulent dust 351 (12)
explosions in enclosures of large LID
(ducts, pipes, galleries, and the like)
4.4.8 Theories of flame propagation in 363 (4)
turbulent dust clouds: computer models
4.5 Detonations in dust clouds in air 367 (18)
4.5.1 Qualitative description of detonation 367 (1)
4.5.2 Experimental evidence of detonations 367 (3)
in dust clouds in air
4.5.3 Theories of detonation 370 (15)
5 Ignition of Dust Clouds and Dust Deposits: 385 (46)
Further Consideration of Some Selected Aspects
5.1 What is ignition? 385 (3)
5.2 Self-heating and self-ignition in powder 388 (16)
deposits
5.2.1 Overviews 388 (1)
5.2.2 Some experimental investigations 389 (8)
5.2.3 Further theoretical work 397 (4)
5.2.4 Applications to different powder/dust 401 (3)
types: a brief literature survey
5.3 Ignition of dust clouds by electric spark 404 (15)
discharges between two metal electrodes
5.3.1 Historical background 404 (1)
5.3.2 The ohmic resistance of a spark 404 (3)
channel between two metal electrodes
5.3.3 Influence of spark discharge duration 407 (8)
on the minimum electric spark ignition
energy for dust clouds
5.3.4 Influence of some further parameters 415 (1)
on the minimum ignition energy of dust
clouds
5.3.5 Theories of electric spark ignition 416 (3)
of dust clouds
5.4 Ignition of dust clouds by heat from 419 (4)
mechanical rubbing, grinding, or impact
between solid bodies
5.4.1 Background 419 (1)
5.4.2 Sparks and hot-spots from rubbing, 420 (1)
grinding, and multiple impacts
5.4.3 Sparks, hot spots, and flashes from 421 (2)
single accidental impacts
5.5 Ignition of dust clouds by hot surfaces 423 (8)
5.5.1 I Experimental study of the influence 423 (1)
of size of the hot surface
5.5.2 Theories for predicting the minimum 424 (7)
ignition temperatures of dust clouds
6 Sizing of Dust Explosion Vents in the Process 431 (42)
Industries: Further Consideration of Some
Important Aspects
6.1 Some vent sizing methods used in Europe 431 (4)
and the United States
6.1.1 Vent ratio method 431 (1)
6.1.2 "Nomograph" method 431 (2)
6.1.3 The Swedish method 433 (1)
6.1.4 The Norwegian method (modified Donat 434 (1)
method)
6.1.5 The Radandt scaling law for vented 434 (1)
silo explosions
6.1.6 Other vent sizing methods 434 (1)
6.2 Comparison of data from recent realistic 435 (17)
full-scale vented dust explosion experiments
with predictions by various vent sizing
methods
6.2.1 Experiments in large silos of L/D
less than_ 4 435
6.2.2 Experiments in slender silos of L/D = 438 (5)
6
6.2.3 Pneumatic pipeline injection 443 (1)
experiments in vessels of small L/D
6.2.4 Experiments in Japan on venting of 444 (3)
dust explosions in a 0.32 m3 cyclone
6.2.5 Realistic experiments in bag filters 447 (4)
6.2.6 Other large-scale experiments 451 (1)
relevant to industrial practice
6.3 Vent sizing procedures for the present 452 (5)
and near future
6.3.1 Basic approach and limitations 452 (1)
6.3.2 Large empty enclosures of L/D less
than 4 453
6.3.3 Large, slender enclosures (Silos) of 453 (1)
L/D > 4
6.3.4 Smaller, slender enclosures of L/D > 4 453 (1)
6.3.5 Intermediate (10-25 m3) enclosures of 454 (1)
small L/D
6.3.6 Cyclones 454 (1)
6.3.7 Bag filters 454 (1)
6.3.8 Mills 455 (1)
6.3.9 Elongated enclosures of very large L/D 455 (1)
6.3.10 Scaling of vent areas to other 455 (1)
enclosure volumes and shapes and to other
Pred and dusts
6.3.11 Concluding remarks 456 (1)
6.4 Influence of actual turbulence intensity 457 (1)
of the burning dust cloud on the maximum
pressure in a vented dust explosion
6.5 Theories of dust explosion venting 458 (7)
6.5.1 Introductory outline 458 (2)
6.5.2 Theory by Maisey 460 (1)
6.5.3 Theory by Heinrich and Kowall 460 (2)
6.5.4 Theory by Rust 462 (1)
6.5.5 Theory by Nomura and Tanaka 462 (1)
6.5.6 Theoretical analysis by Nagy and 463 (1)
Verakis
6.5.7 Theory by Gruber et al. 463 (1)
6.5.8 Theory by Swift 464 (1)
6.5.9 Theory by Ural 464 (1)
6.5.10 Concluding remarks 465 (1)
6.6 Probabilistic nature of the practical 465 (8)
vent sizing problem
6.6.1 Basic philosophy 465 (3)
6.6.2 The "worst credible explosion" 468 (5)
7 Assessment of Ignitability, Explosibility, 473 (76)
and Related Properties of Dusts by
Laboratory-Scale Tests
7.1 Historical background 473 (2)
7.2 A philosophy of testing the ignitability 475 (2)
and explosibility of dusts: the relationship
between test results and the real industrial
hazard
7.3 Sampling of dusts for testing 477 (2)
7.4 Measurement of physical characteristics 479 (9)
of dusts related to their ignitability and
explosibility
7.4.1 Particle size distribution and 479 (1)
specific surface area
7.4.2 Dispersibility 480 (5)
7.4.3 Powder mechanical properties 485 (1)
7.4.4 Moisture content 485 (2)
7.4.5 Electrical resistivity 487 (1)
7.5 Can clouds of the dust produce explosions 488 (2)
at all? Yes/No screening tests
7.6 Can hazardous quantities of explosible 490 (3)
gases evolve from the dust during heating?
7.6.1 The industrial situation 490 (1)
7.6.2 Laboratory tests 491 (2)
7.7 Ignition of dust deposits and layers by 493 (6)
self-heating or hot surfaces
7.7.1 The industrial situation 493 (1)
7.7.2 Laboratory tests 493 (6)
7.8 Minimum ignition temperature of dust 499 (6)
clouds
7.8.1 The industrial situation 499 (1)
7.8.2 Laboratory tests 499 (6)
7.9 Minimum electric spark ignition energy of 505 (3)
dust layers
7.9.1 The industrial situation 505 (1)
7.9.2 Laboratory tests 505 (3)
7.10 Minimum electric spark ignition energy 508 (5)
of dust clouds
7.10.1 The industrial situation 508 (1)
7.10.2 Laboratory tests 508 (5)
7.11 Sensitivity of dust layers to mechanical 513 (2)
impact and friction
7.11.1 The industrial situation 513 (1)
7.11.2 Laboratory tests 513 (2)
7.12 Sensitivity of dust clouds to ignition 515 (3)
by metal sparks, hot spots, or thermite
flashes from accidental mechanical impact
7.12.1 The industrial situation 515 (1)
7.12.2 Laboratory tests 516 (2)
7.13 Minimum explosible dust concentration 518 (7)
7.13.1 The industrial situation 518 (1)
7.13.2 Laboratory tests 519 (6)
7.14 Maximum explosion pressure at constant 525 (8)
volume
7.14.1 The industrial situation 525 (1)
7.14.2 Laboratory tests 526 (7)
7.15 Maximum rate of rise of explosion 533 (3)
pressure at a constant volume (explosion
violence)
7.15.1 The industrial situation 533 (1)
7.15.2 Laboratory tests 534 (1)
7.15.3 Further development of adequate test 535 (1)
methods for dust explosion violence
assessment
7.16 Efficacy of explosion suppression systems 536 (3)
7.17 Maximum explosion pressure and explosion 539 (1)
violence of hybrid mixtures of dust and gas
in air
7.18 Tests of dust clouds at initial 540 (1)
pressures and temperatures other an normal
atmospheric conditions
7.19 Influence of oxygen content in the 540 (2)
oxidizing gas on the ignitability and
explosibility of dust clouds
7.19.1 The industrial situation 540 (1)
7.19.2 Laboratory tests 541 (1)
7.20 Influence of adding inert dust to the 542 (1)
combustible dust on the ignitability and
explosibility of dust clouds
7.21 Hazard classification of explosible dusts 543 (6)
8 Electrical Apparatuses for Areas Containing 549 (31)
Combustible Dusts
8.1 Introduction 549 (4)
8.1.1 Background and objectives of chapter 549 (1)
8.1.2 Basic similarities and differences 550 (1)
between dusts and gases
8.1.3 The "Atex 100a" directive gives 551 (1)
unclear signals with regard to dusts
8.1.4 Scope of the IEC standards on dusts 552 (1)
8.2 Classification of areas containing 553 (4)
combustible dusts
8.2.1 What is area classification? 553 (1)
8.2.2 Definition of zones according to the 553 (1)
three-zone concept
8.2.3 International standards 554 (3)
8.2.4 Need to revise area classification 557 (1)
standards to include dust fires as a hazard
in its own right
8.3 Why different electrical apparatus design 557 (3)
criteria are needed for areas with
combustible dust and explosive gas atmospheres
8.3.1 Influence of inertial forces on the 557 (1)
movement of dust particles
8.3.2 Thermal hazards associated with 558 (1)
accumulation of dust layers inside
electrical apparatus enclosures
8.3.3 Thermal hazards associated with 559 (1)
accumulation of dust layers on external
surfaces of electrical apparatus enclosures
8.4 Enclosing potential ignition sources to 560 (8)
prevent hazardous ingress of dust
8.4.1 The IP code for prevention of dust 560 (2)
ingress
8.4.2 Design of apparatus to prevent 562 (2)
ignition of dust clouds and dust layers by
hot enclosure surfaces
8.4.3 Other requirements to IP enclosures 564 (1)
8.4.4 International standards for design of 564 (1)
enclosures for electrical apparatuses for
areas containing combustible dusts: an
overview
8.4.5 The IEC standard for pressurized 565 (2)
electrical equipment enclosures for areas
containing combustible dust
8.4.6 Encapsulation by molding 567 (1)
8.4.7 Why the concept of flameproof 567 (1)
enclosures is not relevant for combustible
dusts
8.5 Intrinsically safe electrical apparatuses 568 (6)
8.5.1 The original concept for gases and 568 (1)
vapors
8.5.2 The situation with dusts 568 (2)
8.5.3 The new IEC Ex"iD" standard for dusts 570 (1)
8.5.4 Minimum ignition energy, a universal 571 (3)
ignition sensitivity parameter for the
design of electrical apparatuses that are
intrinsically safe in the presence of
explosive dust clouds
8.6 summary and conclusions 574 (6)
8.6.1 "Atex 100a" directive 574 (1)
8.6.2 Area classification 574 (1)
8.6.3 Protection by enclosures 575 (1)
8.6.4 Intrinsic safety 576 (4)
9 Research and Development, 1990-2002 580 (101)
9.1 Introduction 580 (2)
9.1.1 Background and objective of chapter 580 (1)
9.1.2 Books and conference proceedings 580 (2)
published after 1990
9.2 Status and outstanding problems in 582 (28)
fundamental research on dust explosions
9.2.1 The main topics covered 582 (1)
9.2.2 Generation of primary dust clouds and 583 (4)
resulting dust cloud structures
9.2.3 Ignition and combustion of single 587 (8)
particles and dust deposits: ignition of
dust clouds
9.2.4 Flame propagation processes in dust 595 (14)
clouds
9.2.5 Blast waves generated by burning dust 609 (1)
clouds
9.3 Status and outstanding problems in 610 (26)
preventing and mitigating dust explosions in
industry
9.3.1 The role of fundamental knowledge in 610 (1)
assessing hazards in practice
9.3.2 Inherently safe process design 611 (1)
9.3.3 Papers covering several methods and 611 (2)
specific applications
9.3.4 Generation and properties of 613 (1)
explosive dust clouds in industry
9.3.5 Preventing ignition sources 613 (6)
9.3.6 Preventing explosive dust clouds 619 (3)
9.3.7 Protective and mitigatory measures 622 (12)
9.3.8 Risk, safety, and hazards analysis 634 (1)
9.3.9 Human and administrative risk and 634 (1)
hazard factors: risk and safety management
9.3.10 Costs of explosion prevention and 635 (1)
mitigation
9.3.11 New European Union legislation to 635 (1)
prevent and mitigate accidental explosions
9.4 Status and outstanding problems in 636 (5)
testing dust ignitability and explosibility
9.4.1 Historical background and introduction 636 (1)
9.4.2 Two approaches for achieving 637 (1)
differentiation
9.4.3 New test methods 638 (1)
9.4.4 Determining the limits of flame 639 (1)
propagation: a problem of the scale of the
experiment
9.4.5 Miscellaneous 640 (1)
9.5 Dust explosion statistics and case 641 (2)
histories
9.6 Expert systems: friends or enemies? 643 (2)
9.7 Joint research efforts in Europe 645 (1)
9.8 Research and development in the Peoples 646 (1)
Republic of China
9.9 Conclusions 646 (35)
Appendix: Ignitability and Explosibility Data 681 (24)
for Dusts from Laboratory Tests
A.1 Tables A.1, A.2, and A.3 and comments 681 (4)
from the BIA (1987)
A.1.1 Limitations to the applicability of 681 (1)
the data
A.1.2 Comments on the various items in 682 (3)
Table A.1
A.2 Applicability of earlier USBM test data 685
A.2.1 Background 685 (1)
A.2.2 Minimum ignition temperature of the 685 (17)
dust cloud
A.2.3 Minimum ignition temperature of the 702 (1)
dust layer
A.2.4 Minimum ignition energy of the dust 702 (1)
cloud (MIE)
A.2.5 Minimum explosible dust concentration 702 (1)
A.2.6 Maximum explosion pressure 702 (1)
A.2.7 Maximum rate of pressure rise 703 (1)
A.2.8 Maximum permissible 02 concentration 703 (2)
for inerting
Index 705
0879934646
Chapter 1. The Evaluation of Chronic or 1 (22)
Recurrent Respiratory Symptoms in Children
Allen J. Dozor, M.D.
Chapter 2. Noisy Breathing and Stridor in 23 (20)
Infants
Michael J. Rock, M.D.
Chapter 3. Infant Apnea 43 (20)
Charles A. Pohl, M.D. and Alan R. Spitzer,
M.D.
Chapter 4. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children 63 (12)
Lee J. Brooks, M.D.
Chapter 5. Wheezing and Croup in Infants 75 (26)
Karen Z. Voter, M.D. and John T. McBride, M.D.
Chapter 6. Childhood Asthma: Overview 101 (20)
Nikhil Amin, M.D.
Chapter 7. Childhood Asthma: Emergent and 121 (16)
Hospital Care
Gregg A. DiGiulio, M.D. and Richard M. Ruddy,
M.D.
Chapter 8. Childhood Asthma: Management and 137 (26)
Prevention
Nikhil Amin, M.D.
Chapter 9. Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia 163 (24)
Howard B. Panitch, M.D.
Chapter 10. Cystic Fibrosis 187 (48)
Henry L. Dorkin, M.D.
Chapter 11. Severe or Complicated Pneumonia 203
Dennis C. Stokes, M.D. and Lisa H. Lowe, M.D.
Chapter 12. Respiratory Care of Children with 235 (14)
Neuromuscular Disease
Diana B. Lowenthal, M.D.
Chapter 13. Tuberculosis in Children 249 (28)
Karl Li, M.D. aid Jose Munoz, M.D.
Chapter 14. Pediatric Office-Based Smoking 277 (14)
Intervention
Pilar Bradshaw, M.D., Charlotte Stites, M.D.,
and Michael A. Wall, M.D.
Index 291