No Free Lunch : Why Specified Complexity Cannot Be Purchased without Intelligence

個数:

No Free Lunch : Why Specified Complexity Cannot Be Purchased without Intelligence

  • 提携先の海外書籍取次会社に在庫がございます。通常2週間で発送いたします。
    重要ご説明事項
    1. 納期遅延や、ご入手不能となる場合が若干ございます。
    2. 複数冊ご注文の場合、分割発送となる場合がございます。
    3. 美品のご指定は承りかねます。
  • 製本 Hardcover:ハードカバー版/ページ数 403 p.
  • 言語 ENG,ENG
  • 商品コード 9780742512979
  • DDC分類 576.801

Full Description


Darwin's greatest accomplishment was to show how life might be explained as the result of natural selection. But does Darwin's theory mean that life was unintended? William A. Dembski argues that it does not. As the leading proponent of intelligent design, Dembski reveals a designer capable of originating the complexity and specificity found throughout the cosmos. Scientists and theologians alike will find this book of interest as it brings the question of creation firmly into the realm of scientific debate. The paperback is updated with a new Preface by the author.

Table of Contents

        List of Illustrations                      x
Preface xi
The Third Mode of Explanation 1 (44)
Necessity, Chance, and Design 1 (2)
Rehabilitating Design 3 (3)
The Complexity-Specification Criterion 6 (9)
Specification 15 (3)
Probabilistic Resources 18 (4)
False Negatives and False Positives 22 (6)
Why the Criterion Works 28 (2)
The Darwinian Challenge to Design 30 (4)
The Constraining of Contingency 34 (3)
The Darwinian Extrapolation 37 (8)
Another Way to Detect Design? 45 (80)
Fisher's Approach to Eliminating Chance 45 (4)
Generalizing Fisher's Approach 49 (6)
Case Study: Nicholas Caputo 55 (3)
Case Study: The Compressibility of Bit 58 (4)
Strings
Detachability 62 (5)
Sweeping the Field of Chance Hypotheses 67 (4)
Justifying the Generalization 71 (12)
The Inflation of Probabilistic Resources 83 (18)
Design by Comparison 101(9)
Design by Elimination 110(15)
Specified Complexity as Information 125(54)
Information 125(4)
Syntactic, Statistical, and Algorithmic 129(4)
Information
Information in Context 133(4)
Conceptual and Physical Information 137(3)
Complex Specified Information 140(5)
Semantic Information 145(2)
Biological Information 147(2)
The Origin of Complex Specified Information 149(10)
The Law of Conservation of Information 159(7)
A Fourth Law of Thermodynamics? 166(13)
Evolutionary Algorithms 179(60)
Methinks it is Like a Weasel 179(5)
Optimization 184(3)
Statement of the Problem 187(5)
Choosing the Right Fitness Function 192(4)
Blind Search 196(3)
The No Free Lunch Theorems 199(4)
The Displacement Problem 203(4)
Darwinian Evolution in Nature 207(5)
Following the Information Trail 212(12)
Coevolving Fitness Landscapes 224(15)
The Emergence of Irreducibly Complex Systems 239(72)
The Causal Specificity Problem 239(7)
The Challenge of Irreducible Complexity 246(6)
Scaffolding and Roman Arches 252(2)
Co-optation, Patchwork, and Bricolage 254(2)
Incremental Indispensability 256(5)
Reducible Complexity 261(6)
Miscellaneous Objections 267(4)
The Logic of Invariants 271(8)
Fine-Tuning Irreducible Complexity 279(10)
Doing the Calculation 289(22)
Design as a Scientific Research Program 311(70)
Outline of a Positive Research Program 311(3)
The Pattern of Evolution 314(11)
The Incompleteness of Natural Laws 325(3)
Does Specified Complexity Have a Mechanism? 328(5)
The Nature of Nature 333(10)
Must All Design in Nature Be Front-Loaded? 343(4)
Embodied and Unembodied Designers 347(6)
Who Designed the Designer? 353(2)
Testability 355(10)
Magic, Mechanism, and Design 365(16)
Index 381(23)
About the Author 404