Building Care

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Building Care

  • ウェブストア価格 ¥11,790(本体¥10,719)
  • Blackwell Pub(2003/05発売)
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  • 製本 Paperback:紙装版/ペーパーバック版/ページ数 194 p.
  • 言語 ENG
  • 商品コード 9780632060498
  • DDC分類 690.24

Full Description

Building care encompasses everything from maintenance of a building to energy conservation and range of approaches, including the effects on design. A range of approaches to looking after buildings and their users is covered in this book. The rationale and conditions that support them (e.g. PPM -- preventative planned maintenance; JIT -- just in time) are explained, together with the commercial and environmental imperatives driving new approaches to building care.

Table of Contents

Foreword                                           xi
Sir Michael Latham
Preface xiii
Acknowledgements xiv
Background and Introduction 1 (24)
Cinderella and the cowboys 1 (2)
Cowboys 2 (1)
Property conditions 3 (3)
English House Condition Survey (EHCS) 4 (1)
Repair backlogs 5 (1)
Condition or performance-based maintenance 6 (2)
Repair or replace 7 (1)
Deferred maintenance 8 (1)
Influence of the public sector 8 (4)
Programmes 9 (2)
Direct labour organisations 11 (1)
Planned economy 11 (1)
Privatisation 12 (3)
Home ownership and `right to buy' 13 (1)
Non-traditional housing 14 (1)
Non-residential property 15 (2)
Private property 16 (1)
Planned maintenance and the command 17 (3)
economy
`Think big' 18 (1)
Business and the growth of FM 19 (1)
Technology advances 20 (2)
Technology bad, environment and 21 (1)
sustainability good
Summary 22 (1)
References 22 (3)
Planned Preventive Maintenance Prevails 25 (24)
Some definitions 25 (1)
Provenance 26 (4)
Automaticity 26 (1)
Fail to plan; plan to fail 27 (1)
Computers and LAMSAC 28 (1)
Audit Commission and the 3 Es 28 (2)
Condition surveys and elemental repairs 30 (4)
and replacements
Programmes and professional service 31 (1)
Communications and information 32 (2)
technology
Response or emergency maintenance 34 (1)
Objections to PPM 35 (10)
Unutilised service life 35 (1)
User wants and needs: putting the 36 (1)
customer last?
Overspecification and overwork: more 37 (1)
work?
Unresponsiveness 38 (1)
Resource intensity of PPM: simple but 39 (1)
heavy on resources
Unsustainability of PPM 40 (1)
Need for large, non-local contractors 41 (2)
Adversarial nature of contracts 43 (1)
Egan 44 (1)
Postmodern maintenance 45 (1)
Summary 46 (1)
References 46 (3)
Just in Time: Gurus from East and West 49 (19)
Gurus 49 (3)
Japan 52 (1)
Just in time 53 (2)
Hewlett-Packard, Japan and quality 54 (1)
Zen and kaizen 55 (3)
Quality, reliability and defects 56 (2)
Stock and stockrooms 58 (1)
Buyer power and supply chain management 59 (1)
Smyth & Wood, 1995 59 (3)
Background to the study 60 (1)
Returning to core business 61 (1)
Just-in-time maintenance 62 (3)
Emergence of JIT maintenance 63 (1)
Organisational consequence 64 (1)
Findings from the research 64 (1)
Summary 65 (1)
References 65 (3)
Procurement of Building Maintenance Services 68 (16)
Context 68 (2)
Contracts and relationships 70 (3)
Service and `service culture' 72 (1)
Who procures? 72 (1)
Who is the client? 73 (1)
Commissioning of maintenance work 73 (2)
Who will procure what, when, how, how 73 (1)
often and why?
Priorities: time/cost/quality 74 (1)
Assigning priorities 74 (1)
Developing the client-contractor 75 (3)
relationship
Historical development 76 (1)
The service context: building 77 (1)
relationships
Developing and defining just-in-time 78 (3)
maintenance
Performing to standard 79 (1)
Setting JIT performance goals 79 (1)
Implications for building contractors 79 (1)
and consultants
Built-in maintenance 80 (1)
Implications for building owners and 81 (1)
users
Conclusion 81 (1)
Summary 82 (1)
References 82 (2)
Re-engineering the Process 84 (15)
Hammer & Champy 84 (4)
Critiquing `re-engineering' 84 (1)
Aggressive language 85 (1)
Middle way forward 86 (1)
Implementation 86 (1)
Incrementalism 87 (1)
Background to re-engineering building 88 (3)
maintenance services
Structure of work 89 (1)
Service development 90 (1)
Re-engineering 90 (1)
Planned preventive maintenance 91 (3)
Predictive maintenance 91 (1)
Intelligent buildings 92 (1)
Intelligent maintenance 93 (1)
Customer care and service culture 93 (1)
Call centres 94 (1)
Construction business process 94 (2)
Skills shortages 94 (1)
Barriers to entry 95 (1)
Client focus 96 (1)
Re-engineering ways ahead 96 (1)
Summary 97 (1)
References 97 (2)
Enter Customer Care, Contact and Call 99 (18)
Centres
Background 99 (1)
Supermarket lessons 100 (1)
Customer care 100 (2)
Building care 102 (1)
Users, care and service 103 (1)
A wider view 103 (2)
The housing maintenance market 104 (1)
The call centre or contact centre 105 (3)
Features of the call centre 106 (2)
Features of call-centred maintenance 108 (2)
Responsiveness and responsibility 108 (1)
Assuring standards 109 (1)
Whither the cowboy? 110 (3)
Beyond the call centre: coming closer to 113 (1)
home through the help desk
Conclusion 114 (1)
Summary 115 (1)
References 115 (2)
Intelligent Building Care 117 (15)
Intelligence and the intelligent building 117 (3)
Data and information 118 (1)
Control 119 (1)
Complexity and complication 119 (1)
The automated building 120 (7)
Comfort 121 (1)
Automaticity 122 (1)
Smartness 123 (1)
Greenness 124 (1)
Comfort versus control 124 (2)
The individual versus Big Brother 126 (1)
Intelligent service 127 (2)
Market intelligence 128 (1)
Meaning and application 129 (1)
Summary 129 (1)
References 130 (2)
Sustainable Building Care 132 (20)
Sustainability 132 (1)
The sustainable building 133 (2)
Sustainability at the design stage 134 (1)
Sustainable construction 135 (3)
Plant 136 (1)
Labour 137 (1)
Materials 137 (1)
Finance 137 (1)
Sustainable care 138 (6)
Durability 139 (1)
Use 140 (1)
Radical review and change 141 (1)
Adaptability 142 (2)
The autonomous building 144 (4)
Users and user needs 146 (1)
Autonomous building care 147 (1)
Approaching sustainable building care 148 (1)
Value and values: today and tomorrow 149 (1)
Summary 150 (1)
References 150 (2)
Building Futures: Left or Right? 152 (18)
Introduction 152 (2)
The design stage 153 (1)
Forecasting the future 154 (1)
Living for today and planning for 154 (1)
posterity
Who pays, for what, how much and when? 155 (1)
Lifecycle costing 155 (2)
Sustainable future 157 (2)
The LEFT building 159 (2)
Long Life 159 (1)
Low Energy 160 (1)
Loose Fit/Flexible 160 (1)
Low Technology 161 (1)
The RIGHT building 161 (4)
Reusability 162 (1)
Intelligence 163 (1)
Greenness 163 (1)
High Technology 164 (1)
Alternative futures 165 (1)
Building care 165 (1)
Sustainable care 165 (1)
Sustainable building 166 (1)
Opportunities 166 (2)
The maintenance-free building 167 (1)
The care-free building 167 (1)
Conclusion 168 (1)
Summary 169 (1)
References 169 (1)
Cradle to Grave: Whole-Life Assessment and 170 (19)
Implications for Design
Introduction 170 (1)
Cradle-to-grave care 171 (2)
Lifecycle costing 172 (1)
Economic factors 173 (1)
What is `life'? 173 (2)
Design for low or no maintenance 175 (9)
Design and sustainability 176 (1)
Defects 177 (7)
Conclusion 184 (2)
Summary 186 (1)
References 186 (3)
Index 189