Life and Public Services of Edwin M. Stanton 〈2〉

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Life and Public Services of Edwin M. Stanton 〈2〉

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  • 製本 Hardcover:ハードカバー版/ページ数 502 p.
  • 言語 ENG
  • 商品コード 9780548138175
  • DDC分類 920

Table of Contents

PART VI McCLELLAN'S INSUBORDINATION.  FROM
HARRISON'S LANDING TO ANTIETAM
CHAPTER LXI 1
The Army at Harrison's Landing.
McClellan's Demands.
Correspondence with Stanton
CHAPTER LXII 5
McClellan's Harrison's Landing Letter,
instructing the President and Congress as
to their Civil Duties.
A Bid for the Presidency, so framed as to
satisfy the Anti-War Party.
Fitz John Porter's Confirmatory Statement
of this in After Years
CHAPTER LXIII 11
Operations in Northern Virginia.
Defense of the Capital.
Rebel Operations in the Shenandoah Valley.
Pope's Command.
He corresponds with McClellan.
The Latter demands 100,000 more Men
CHAPTER LXIV 14
Halleck made General-in-Chief.
He visits McClellan.
Perilous Situation of the Capital and of
the Army under Pope.
McClellan ordered to withdraw his Army from
the James River and unite it with the Army
in Northern Virginia.
The Order ignored for Eleven Days
CHAPTER LXV 22
McClellan's Private Letters.
His Fears that he will be superseded.
His Denunciations of Pope.
Predicts his Defeat, and his own Triumph as
the Result
CHAPTER LXVI 29
McClellan at Alexandria.
His Insubordination and Withholding of
Troops.
Only One Fifth of his Army succors Pope.
Consequent Loss of the Second Battle of
Bull Run and of the Campaign
CHAPTER LXVII 36
Alarm at Washington.
McClellan's Removal advocated by a Majority
of the Cabinet
CHAPTER LXVIII 42
President Lincoln's Opinion of McClellan's
Conduct.
He nevertheless continues him in Command
under Compulsion.
The Reasons which governed him.
Stormy Cabinet Meeting.
Stanton refuses to issue the Order placing
McClellan in Command
CHAPTER LXIX 49
Lee's Invasion of Maryland.
McClellan sent into the Field by the
President.
Discovery of Lee's Plans.
Failure to act upon the Knowledge.
Battle of Antietam.
The Entire Enemy engaged against a Portion
only of the Union Forces.
Porter not in the Action.
McClellan treats it as a Drawn Battle until
after Lee's Escape into Virginia
CHAPTER LXX 58
McClellan refuses to follow the Enemy.
His Varied Excuses shown to be without
Foundation.
The President's Orders disobeyed.
Unable to overcome McClellan's
Insubordination, he removes him from
Command.
McClellan's Statement that he was urged to
revolt and march against Washington
PART VII EMANCIPATION. DECISIVE UNION VICTORIES
CHAPTER LXXI 75
The Political Campaign of 1862.
Emancipation an Issue.
Schemes of the Peace Party as disclosed by
its Leaders to the British Minister at
Washington.
They favored an Armistice, with Peace or
Disunion.
Union Losses at the Polls
CHAPTER LXXII 86
Emancipation Proclamation.
Mr. Stanton on its Advantages
CHAPTER LXXIII 91
Military Movements in the West.
Perryville, Murfreesboro.
The Fall of Vicksburg
CHAPTER LXXIV 95
Military Movements in the East.
Burnside and Hooker.
Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville.
Lee's Invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania.
Conference between President Lincoln and
Secretary Stanton on the Eve of the Battle
of Gettysburg results in relieving Hooker,
and the Appointment of Meade to Command.
The Great Victory.
Meade's Failure to pursue Lee.
Mr. Lincoln at Gettysburg.
His Speech at the Dedication of the
National Cemetery
CHAPTER LXXV 104
The New York Draft-Riots.
Unwise Provisions in Conscription Act
utilized by the Anti-War Faction.
Active Measures restored Order.
Mr. Stanton's Letter against submitting the
Constitutionality of the Law to the State
Tribunal.
If States can obstruct Federal Laws, the
Rebellion is consummated
CHAPTER LXXVI 114
Suspension of the Writ of Habeas Corpus.
Mr. Stanton's Letter and the Proclamation
of the President.
The Reason for the Constitutional Provision
on the Subject.
CHAPTER LXXVII 118
The Elections of 1863.
Union Successes.
Attitude of the Opposition considered.
Many of its Leaders Conspirators.
Its Majority attached to the Union.
CHAPTER LXXVIII 121
The War in the West.
The Disaster at Chickamauga.
Stanton's Plan for reinforcing Rosecrans,
by which 23,000 Troops were transported
from Virginia to Chattanooga, Twelve
Hundred Miles, in Seven Days
CHAPTER LXXIX 131
Stanton meets General Grant at Louisville,
Kentucky.
Grant placed in Command of the Armies of
the Ohio, the Cumberland, and the
Tennessee, with Headquarters at Chattanooga.
Rout of Bragg's Army.
Grant on the Result.
Stanton's Summary of the Year's Operations.
Grant made Lieutenant-General with
Headquarters in the East.
Sherman succeeds him in the West
PART VIII END OF THE WAR AND DISBANDMENT OF THE
ARMY
CHAPTER LXXX 140
The Presidential Campaign of 1864.
Its Vital Importance.
Lincoln and McClellan.
The Latter for the Union by Compromise and
Conciliation.
Also for the War on a Peace Platform, and a
Cessation of Hostilities for Peace
Negotiations.
Machinations of the Copperheads.
Conferences between their Representative
Men and the Rebel Emissaries in Canada as
reported to Mason and Slidell by Jacob
Thompson.
Plots for a "Western Confederacy" which 140
would dictate Terms to the United States
CHAPTER LXXXI 148
A Voluntary Peace Commissioner.
Hon. Jeremiah S. Black visits the Rebel
Commissioners, Thompson and Clay, in Canada.
His Correspondence with Mr. Stanton on the
Subject
CHAPTER LXXXII 154
The Presidential Election.
Stanton's Precautions against Rebel Raids
from Canada, and the Colonization of Voters.
His Order to Department Commanders.
General Grant cooperates with him.
General Butler in Command in New York City.
Voting by Soldiers in the Field.
Reelection of Lincoln.
His Comments on the Result.
CHAPTER LXXXIII 162
The Last Year of the War.
Sherman's March to the Sea.
Grant's Campaign against Lee's Army.
Early's Raid on Washington.
Sheridan's Brilliant Operations in the
Shenandoah Valley.
The Spring Campaign.
The Surrender of Lee's Army.
CHAPTER LXXXIV 168
Flight of Jefferson Davis.
The Assassination of President Lincoln.
Accession of Andrew Johnson to the
Presidency.
CHAPTER LXXXV 170
Jefferson Davis sues for Peace.
His Secretary of War conducts Negotiations
with General Sherman, and presents
Propositions approved by Davis.
Sherman's Substitute concedes more than was
asked.
Terms agreed on Subject to Formal Approval
of President Johnson and Jefferson Davis.
Sherman's Announcement to the Army
CHAPTER LXXXVI 181
The Sherman-Johnston Terms continued.
Disapproved by the President and his
Cabinet and General Grant.
Stanton's Nine Reasons.
Comments by Senators Sherman, Trumbull,
Fessenden, and Collamer, and George
Bancroft.
Sherman's Meeting with Secretary Stanton on
the Reviewing-Stand at Washington
CHAPTER LXXXVII 200
National Rejoicings tempered by the Death
of President Lincoln.
Pursuit of the Assassins.
Death of Booth, their Leader.
Arrest, Trial, Conviction, and Execution of
Sentences on the Others.
President Johnson overruled a
Recommendation of Mercy for Mrs. Surratt
CHAPTER LXXXVIII 207
Jefferson Davis.
The Causes of his Detention.
His Indictment in Virginia on the Charge of
Treason.
His Trial prevented by Continued Military
Rule.
His Release.
CHAPTER LXXXIX 212
Final Surrender of Remaining Rebel Forces.
Rapid Mustering out of the Union Troops.
Stanton's Annual Report.
His Review of the War, and of the
Operations of the War Department.
A Tribute to Stanton
PART IX RECONSTRUCTION. PRESIDENT JOHNSON'S PLAN
CHAPTER XC 224
Attitude of the Belligerents after the War.
Questions as to the Status of the Rebel
States and People.
CHAPTER XCI 233
Reconstruction.
Mr. Lincoln's Views on the Subject during
the War and immediately after Lee's
Surrender.
CHAPTER XCII 241
Stanton on Reconstruction.
His Draft of a Mode read in Cabinet Meeting
on the Last Day of Mr. Lincoln's Life.
President Lincoln forbids the Assembling of
the Rebel Legislature of Virginia after
Lee's Surrender.
President Johnson's Order to Military
Commanders to prevent the Exercise of
Authority by any of the Rebel State
Governments.
CHAPTER XCIII 246
President Johnson's Plan of Reconstruction.
His Declarations that the Governments to be
organized under it would be Provisional
only until approved by Congress
CHAPTER XCIV 256
Proceedings of the Southern State
Conventions called under the President's
Proclamation.
The President's Demands on those
Conventions.
His Letter to Sharkey, of Mississippi,
discloses a Change of Purpose.
He designates Union "Radicals" as the
"Adversary"
CHAPTER XCV 269
Results of the Johnson Policy.
Ex-Rebels in Control of the Conventions and
Legislatures.
They act without Pressure from Northern
Radicalism.
Unfriendly Legislation concerning the
Freedmen.
CHAPTER XCVI 276
The Conflict between Congress and the
President.
The Latter demands the Admission of
Senators and Representatives from the Late
Confederate States before the Establishment
therein of Lawful State Governments.
Claims Recognition of the Provisional
Governments established by himself under
Military Rule, Regardless of the Action of
Congress.
CHAPTER XCVII 285
The President continues Military Rule in
the States which he declares to be restored
to all their Original Rights.
Treats them as still in Rebellion by
refusing to annul the Suspension of the
Writ of Habeas Corpus.
Veto of the Freedmen's Bureau Bill.
His Assault upon Congress.
His Mob Speech at the White House.
Denounces Congressional Leaders by Name.
Congress declares the Ineligibility at that
Time of Southern States to Representation.
CHAPTER XCVIII 293
Trumbull's Civil Rights Bill a Peace
Offering.
Supposed by him to be Satisfactory to the
President.
Its Passage and Veto.
Passed over the Veto.
CHAPTER XCIX 300
Divisions in the Cabinet.
A Johnson Party formed.
A Serenade to force Expression from Stanton
which might give the President Excuse to
remove him.
Stanton's Speech.
He remains in the Cabinet the only Opponent
of the "Johnson Policy".
PART X RECONSTRUCTION. THE PLAN OF CONGRESS
CHAPTER C 312
A Riot in New Orleans.
Its Causes and its Leaders.
A Massacre by Supporters of the President.
Report of General Sheridan.
CHAPTER CI 323
Further concerning the New Orleans Riot.
Statement by Mr. Stanton.
The Underlying Cause of the Tragedy.
Commencement of the War to prevent Negro
Enfranchisement.
CHAPTER CII 329
The Congressional Campaign of 1866.
"Swinging around the Circle."
The President's Disorderly and Inflammatory
Speeches from the Stump.
Increased Radical Majorities elected to
Congress.
Tennessee restored to Representation upon
ratifying the Fourteenth Amendment.
CHAPTER CIII 337
Importance of the War Department in the
Great Struggle.
Stanton's Attitude as an Obstacle to the
Reactionists.
They loudly demand his Resignation.
His Reasons for remaining in the War Office.
CHAPTER CIV 341
A Review of the Work of Congress.
The Fourteenth Amendment submitted to the
States.
Its Terms.
Its Adoption would have ended the Long
Controversy.
Moderation of the Majority in Congress up
to the Time of Rejection.
The Military Reconstruction Act passed over
the Veto.
Precautionary Measures by Congress.
CHAPTER CV 352
The New Congress.
Supplementary Reconstruction Act.
Conflicting Constructions of the Law.
The President and his Attorney-General
antagonized by Secretary Stanton and the
Military Commanders.
CHAPTER CVI 360
Mr. Stanton and the Attorney-General.
Cabinet Proceedings.
CHAPTER CVII 372
Supplementary Reconstruction Act.
Original Draft made by Mr. Stanton.
It left no Room for Misconstruction.
Grant's Support of it.
CHAPTER CVIII 376
General Grant's Conviction led him to
Unqualified Support of the Policy of
Congress.
His Correspondence with District Commanders.
His Latest Utterances on the Subject.
CHAPTER CIX 383
A Long Recess of Congress.
Tenure of Office Bill opposed by Stanton.
A Makeshift to avoid Impeachment.
Terms of the Military Reconstruction Act.
Repressive Policy discussed.
Home Rule long since restored.
PART XI STANTON'S STRUGGLE WITH JOHNSON. ITS
RESULTS. STANTON'S DEATH
CHAPTER CX 393
General Grant's Warning to President
Johnson.
Stanton's Refusal to resign from the
Cabinet at the President's Request brings
upon him Severe Criticisms and also Strong
Indorsements.
CHAPTER CXI 405
Stanton suspended by the President.
Grant accepts Appointment of Secretary of
War ad interim.
Letters sustaining Stanton
CHAPTER C XII 409
Mr. Stanton in New England.
Much depressed.
"One Interview with General Grant" would do
much to set him Right.
A Letter to Professor Draper.
CHAPTER CXIII 413
The Meeting of Congress.
The President informs the Senate of
Stanton's Suspension, and assigns Reasons
therefor.
Stanton's Reply.
The Senate reinstates him in the War Office.
Stanton on the Suspension of Exchange of
Prisoners.
CHAPTER CXIV 428
Stanton again in the War Office.
Misunderstandings between him and General
Grant.
Their Causes.
Controversy between Grant and the President.
President decides to remove Stanton.
CHAPTER CXV 438
President's Order removing Stanton and
appointing a Secretary ad interim.
Stanton resists the Order and notifies the
Two Houses of Congress.
The Senate on the Same Day sustains Stanton.
Stanton remains in Continuous Personal
Possession of the Department Night and Day
for Several Weeks.
General Grant details a Military Guard to
protect the Building and the Public
Archives from Rumored Ruffianism.
The House votes to impeach the President.
CHAPTER CXVI 446
The Articles of Impeachment.
The Impeachment Trial in the Senate.
Outside Influences brought to bear on
Senators.
General Schofield's Statement of what he
learned on this Head from one of the
President's Counsel.
The Vote in the Senate.
One Less than the Two Thirds necessary to
convict.
A Tainted Verdict.
Mr. Stanton relinquishes the War Department.
The Impeachment Trial forced President
Johnson to abandon his Rebellious Attitude.
CHAPTER CXVII 458
The Duties of the Secretary of War.
Conflicts with the General of the Army.
Differences between Stanton and Grant.
Stanton's Views finally accepted by Grant.
General Schofield also adopted them when
General-in-Chief.
CHAPTER CXVIII 465
Mr. Stanton in Retirement.
Thanks of Congress.
Mr. Dana's Eloquent Tribute.
Speeches for Grant.
Practicing his Profession.
His Financial Condition.
President Grant's Friendly Attitude.
Stanton's Last Illness.
His Appointment as Justice of the Supreme
Court.
The Pleasure it gave him.
His Death
CHAPTER CXIX 476
Honors to Stanton's Memory.
President Grant's Announcement of his Death.
Order of War Department.
Action of Senators and Representatives.
Funeral Obsequies.
CHAPTER CXX 479
President Grant's Letter to Mrs. Stanton.
Proceedings in the Supreme Court of the
United States in Relation to the Death of
Mr. Stanton.
Eulogy by the Attorney-General.
Resolutions of the Bar.
Remarks of the Chief Justice.
CHAPTER CXXI 487
Conclusion.
INDEX 491