Interviewing for Solutions (2ND)

Interviewing for Solutions (2ND)

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  • 言語 ENG,ENG
  • 商品コード 9780534584733
  • DDC分類 150

Table of Contents

  From Problem Solving to Solution Building        1  (12)
Helping as Problem Solving 5 (3)
The Stages of Problem Solving 5 (1)
A Caveat: The Importance of Trust 6 (1)
Development
The Medical Model 6 (1)
Problem Solving: The Paradigm of the 6 (2)
Helping Professions
Helping as Solution Building 8 (5)
Concerns about the Problem-Solving 8 (3)
Paradigm
History of Solution Building 11 (2)
Solution Building: The Basics 13 (7)
A Second Interview with Rosie 13 (3)
Solution-Building Interviewing Activities 16 (1)
The Stages of Solution Building 17 (1)
Describing the Problem 17 (1)
Developing Well-Formed Goals 18 (1)
Exploring for Exceptions 18 (1)
End of Session Feedback 18 (1)
Evaluating Client Progress 18 (1)
The Client as Expert 18 (2)
Skills for Not Knowing 20 (32)
Basic Interviewing Skills 21 (29)
Listening 21 (1)
Formulating Questions 22 (2)
Getting Details 24 (1)
Echoing Clients' Key Words 25 (1)
Open Questions 26 (1)
Summarizing 27 (2)
Paraphrasing 29 (1)
Practitioners' Nonverbal Behavior 29 (1)
The Use of Silence 30 (1)
Noticing Clients' Nonverbal Behavior 31 (1)
Self-Disclosing 32 (1)
Noticing Process 33 (1)
Complimenting 34 (2)
Affirming Clients' Perceptions 36 (3)
Natural Empathy 39 (2)
Normalizing 41 (2)
Returning the Focus to the Client 43 (1)
Noticing Hints of Possibility 44 (2)
Exploring Client Meanings 46 (1)
Relationship Questions 47 (1)
Amplifying Solution Talk 48 (2)
Leading from One Step Behind 50 (2)
Getting Started: How to Pay Attention to What 52 (24)
the Client Wants
When You First Meet Your Client 52 (3)
Names and Small Talk 52 (2)
Clarifying How You Work 54 (1)
Problem Description 55 (3)
Asking for Client Perceptions and 55 (1)
Respecting Client Language
How Does the Problem Affect the Client? 56 (1)
What Has the Client Tried? 57 (1)
What Is Most Important for the Client to 58 (1)
Work on First?
How to Work with Clients on What They Might 58 (14)
Want
Customer-Type Relationship 59 (1)
A Word of Caution 60 (1)
Complainant-Type Relationship 60 (3)
Visitor-Type Relationship 63 (8)
What If Clients Want What Is Not Good for 71 (1)
Them?
What if Clients Do Not Want Anything at 71 (1)
All?
Influencing Client Cooperation and 72 (4)
Motivation
How to Amplify What Clients Want: The Miracle 76 (27)
Question
Characteristics of Well-Formed Goals 78 (6)
Importance to the Client 78 (1)
Interactional Terms 79 (1)
Situational Features 79 (1)
The Presence of Some Desirable Behaviors 80 (1)
Rather than the Absence of Problems
A Beginning Step Rather than the Final 81 (1)
Result
Clients' Recognition of a Role for 82 (1)
Themselves
Concrete, Behavioral, Measurable Terms 82 (1)
Realistic Terms 83 (1)
A Challenge to the Client 83 (1)
Conclusion 84 (1)
The Miracle Question 84 (19)
Ah Yan's Miracle Picture 86 (4)
The Williams Family 90 (11)
The Art of Interviewing for Well-Formed 101(1)
Goals
Avoiding Premature Closure 102(1)
Exploring for Exceptions: Building on Client 103(13)
Strengths and Successes
Exceptions 104(4)
Definition 104(1)
Interviewing for Exceptions 104(1)
Ah Yan's Exceptions 105(1)
Client Successes and Strengths 106(1)
Respecting the Client's Words and Frame 107(1)
of Reference
Scaling Questions 108(3)
Prosession-Change Scaling 108(2)
Scaling Motivation and Confidence 110(1)
Exceptions: The Williams Family 111(3)
Building toward a Difference that Makes a 114(2)
Difference
Formulating Feedback for Clients 116(25)
Taking a Break 117(1)
The Structure of Feedback 117(2)
Compliments 118(1)
The Bridge 118(1)
Tasks 119(1)
Deciding on a Task 119(2)
Are There Well-Formed Goals? 119(1)
What Is the Client-Practitioner 120(1)
Relationship?
Are There Exceptions? 121(1)
Feedback for Ah Yan 121(2)
Feedback for the Williams Family 123(5)
Feedback Guidelines 128(1)
Common Messages 128(8)
Client in a Visitor Relationship 129(1)
Client in a Complainant Relationship 129(3)
Client in a Customer Relationship 132(4)
Other Useful Messages 136(2)
The Overcoming-the-Urge Task 136(1)
Addressing Competing Views of the Solution 136(2)
Decisions about the Next Session 138(1)
Cribsheets, Protocols, and Notetaking 139(2)
Later Sessions: Finding, Amplifying, and 141(32)
Measuring Client Progress
``What's Better?'' 142(8)
EARS 143(1)
Ah Yan 144(6)
Doing More of the Same 150(1)
Scaling 151(1)
Scaling Progress 151(1)
Scaling Confidence 151(1)
Next Steps 152(4)
Termination 156(2)
The Break 158(1)
Feedback 159(1)
Compliments 159(1)
Bridge 160(1)
Task 160(1)
The Second Session with the Williams Family 160(11)
``What's Better?'' 160(8)
Break 168(1)
Feedback 168(2)
Bridge 170(1)
Task 170(1)
Setbacks, Relapses, and Times When Nothing 171(1)
Is Better
Conclusion 172(1)
Interviewing the Involuntary: Children, 173(44)
Dyads, and Mandated Clients
Taking a Solution Focus 175(1)
Key Ideas for Solution Building with 175(4)
Involuntary Clients
Assume a Visiting Relationship 176(1)
Responding to Anger and Negativity 176(1)
Listen for Who and What Are Important 177(1)
Use Relationship Questions to Address 177(1)
Context
Incorporating Nonnegotiable Requirements 178(1)
Giving Control to Clients 178(1)
Guidelines, Useful Questions, and a 179(1)
Protocol for Interviewing Involuntary
Clients
Building Solutions with Children 179(13)
Children as Involuntary Clients 180(1)
Getting Prepared to Meet a Child 180(1)
Getting Started with Positives 181(1)
Englisting Adults as Allies 182(1)
Getting the Child's Perceptions 183(4)
Other Tips for Interviewing Children 187(5)
Interviewing Dyads 192(13)
Focus on the Relationship 192(1)
Getting Started 193(2)
Work toward a Common Goal 195(8)
Other Tips 203(2)
Conclusion 205(1)
Working with Mandated Clients 205(11)
Getting Started 205(4)
Getting More Details about the Client's 209(1)
Understandings and What the Client Wants
Asking about Context with Relationship 210(2)
Questions
Coconstructing Competence 212(2)
Back on Familiar Ground 214(1)
What about Making Recommendations that 214(2)
the Client Opposes?
Final Word 216(1)
Interviewing in Crisis Situations 217(22)
Solution Focus versus Problem Focus 218(1)
Getting Started: ``How Can I Help?'' 219(1)
``What Have You Tried?'' 220(1)
``What Do You Want to Have Different?'' 220(4)
Asking the Miracle Question 223(1)
Coping Questions 224(7)
The Case of Jermaine 224(1)
Coping Exploration 225(2)
Connecting with the Larger Picture 227(1)
Using Coping Questions with Clients Who 227(4)
Talk Suicide
Scaling Questions 231(2)
Scaling Current Coping Ability 231(1)
Scaling Presession Coping Changes 232(1)
Scaling the Next Step 232(1)
Scaling Motivation and Confidence 233(1)
Feedback: Doing More of What Helps 233(1)
Gathering Problem-Assessment Information 234(3)
When the Client Remains Overwhelmed 237(1)
Conclusion 237(2)
Outcomes 239(9)
Early Research at Brief Family Therapy 240(2)
Center
1992--1993 Study Design 240(1)
Participants 240(1)
Outcome Measurement 241(1)
Results 242(2)
Length of Services 242(1)
Intermediate Outcomes 242(1)
Final Outcomes 243(1)
Comparative Data 244(1)
Other Studies of Solution-Focused Therapy 245(3)
Professional Values and Human Diversity 248(15)
Solution Building and Professional Values 249(7)
Respecting Human Dignity 249(1)
Individualizing Service 250(1)
Fostering Client Vision 251(1)
Building on Strengths 252(1)
Encouraging Client Participation 252(1)
Maximizing Self-Determination 252(1)
Fostering Transferability 253(1)
Maximizing Client Empowerment 254(1)
Protecting Confidentiality 254(1)
Promoting Normalization 255(1)
Monitoring Change 256(1)
Conclusion 256(1)
Diversity-Competent Practice 256(7)
Outcome Data on Diversity 258(3)
Diversity and Satisfaction with Services 261(2)
Agency, Group, and Community Practice 263(12)
Solution Building and Agency Practice 263(7)
Recordkeeping 263(4)
Relationships with Collaterals 267(1)
Relationships with Collaterals 268(2)
Group and Organizational Practice 270(5)
Group Practice 270(3)
Organizational Applications 273(2)
Theoretical Implications 275(12)
Shifts in Client Perceptions and Definitions 276(2)
Social Constructionism 278(2)
Shifting Paradigms 280(3)
Outcome Data 280(3)
Shifting Perceptions and Definitions as a 283(4)
Client Strength
Appendix: Solution-Building Tools 287(25)
References 312(6)
Index 318