The Crisis of Liberal Italy : Monetary and Financial Policy, 1914-1922

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The Crisis of Liberal Italy : Monetary and Financial Policy, 1914-1922

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  • 製本 Hardcover:ハードカバー版
  • 言語 ENG
  • 商品コード 9780521416825
  • DDC分類 338.945009041

Full Description


In this major interpretation of the crisis of democracy in Italy after World War I, Douglas Forsyth uses unpublished documents in Italy's central state archives, as well as private papers, diplomatic and bank archives in Italy, France, Britain and the United States, to analyse monetary and financial policy in Italy from the outbreak of war until the march on Rome. The study focuses on real and perceived conflicts and often painful choices between great power politics, economic growth, macroeconomic stabilisation and the preservation or strengthening of democratic consensus. The key issue explored is why governments in Italy after World War I, although headed by left-liberal reformers, were unable to press ahead with the democratic reformism which had characterised the so-called 'Giolittian era', 1901-1914. Their failure paved the way for parliamentary deadlock and Mussolini's seizure of power.

Table of Contents

Part I. Giolittian Italy, 1901-1914: 1. The
political economy of Giolittian Italy: the
dilemmas of welfare, warfare and development
Part II. World War I, August 1914-November
1918: 2. The collapse of the Italian fiscal
system
3. The limits of state borrowing capacity
4. Monetary policy and the banking system
5. International accounts: Italy's loss of
financial independence
Part III. The Post-War Crisis, November
1918-October 1922: 6. A difficult readjustment:
the political economy of the Orlando and Nitti
governments, November 1918-June 1920
7. From Giolitti to Mussolini: monetary and
financial stabilisation, and political collapse
Conclusion.