High Energy Astrophysics : Particles, Photons and Their Detection 〈001〉 (2ND)

  • ポイントキャンペーン

High Energy Astrophysics : Particles, Photons and Their Detection 〈001〉 (2ND)

  • ただいまウェブストアではご注文を受け付けておりません。 ⇒古書を探す
  • 製本 Paperback:紙装版/ペーパーバック版
  • 言語 ENG,ENG
  • 商品コード 9780521387736
  • DDC分類 523.0197

Table of Contents

Preface                                            xv
Acknowledgements xvii
High energy astrophysics - two approaches 1 (38)
Introduction - the author's dilemma 1 (2)
Historical perspective I - a history of 3 (15)
cosmic ray physics
The discovery of sub-atomic particles - 3 (4)
1890-1910
The discovery of cosmic rays 7 (6)
Cosmic rays and the discovery of 13 (4)
elementary particles
Cosmic ray astrophysics from space and 17 (1)
from the ground
Historical perspective II - the origin of 18 (14)
high energy astrophysics
Radio astronomy 20 (5)
X-ray and γ-ray astronomy 25 (2)
Ultraviolet and infrared astronomy 27 (1)
Neutral hydrogen and molecular line 28 (1)
astronomy
Optical astronomy 29 (1)
Theoretical astronomy 30 (2)
Units, basic definitions and wavebands 32 (7)
SI units 32 (1)
Special relativity, four-vectors and 33 (1)
basic energy relations
Astronomical wavebands 34 (5)
Interaction of high-energy particles with 39 (21)
matter I - Ionisation losses
Introduction 39 (1)
Ionisation losses - non-relativistic 40 (5)
treatment
The relativistic case 45 (4)
The relativistic transformation of an 45 (1)
inverse square law Coulomb field
Relativistic ionisation losses 46 (2)
Relativistic collision between a high 48 (1)
energy particle and a stationary electron
Relativistic ionisation losses and 49 (6)
practical forms of the formulae
Relativistic ionisation losses 49 (2)
Practical forms of the ionisation loss 51 (4)
formulae
A diversion - ionisation losses and 55 (3)
dynamical friction
Comments 58 (2)
Interactions of high energy particles with 60 (28)
matter II - Electrons: ionisation losses and
bremsstrahlung
Introduction 60 (1)
Ionisation losses of electrons 60 (1)
The radiation of accelerated charged 61 (10)
particles
A useful relativistic invariant 62 (1)
The radiation of an accelerated charged 62 (4)
particle - J. J. Thomson's treatment
The radiation of an accelerated charged 66 (3)
particle - improved treatment
The radiation losses from accelerated 69 (1)
charged particles moving at relativistic
velocities
Parseval's theorem and the spectral 70 (1)
distribution of radiation of an
accelerated electron
Bremsstrahlung 71 (4)
Non-relativistic and thermal bremsstrahlung 75 (8)
Non-relativistic bremsstrahlung losses 76 (1)
Thermal bremsstrahlung 76 (3)
Thermal bremsstrahlung absorption 79 (4)
Relativistic bremsstrahlung 83 (5)
Interactions of high energy photons 88 (43)
Introduction 88 (1)
Photoelectric absorption 89 (2)
Compton scattering 91 (27)
Thomson scattering 92 (4)
Compton scattering 96 (4)
Inverse Compton scattering 100 (5)
Comptonisation 105 (13)
Electron-positron pair production 118 (2)
Electron-photon cascades or electromagnetic 120 (2)
showers
Cherenkov radiation and ultrahigh energy 122 (5)
γ-rays
Electron-positron annihilation and positron 127 (4)
production mechanisms
Nuclear interactions 131 (24)
Nuclear physics and high energy astrophysics 131 (3)
High energy protons 132 (2)
Cosmic ray nuclei 134 (1)
Spallation cross-sections 134 (6)
Nuclear emission lines 140 (6)
Nucleonic cascades 146 (3)
Cosmic rays in the atmosphere 149 (2)
Radioactive nuclei produced by cosmic rays 151 (4)
in the atmosphere
Detectors for high energy particles, X-rays 155 (23)
and γ-rays
Introduction 155 (1)
Nuclear emulsions and the study of high 155 (3)
energy particles
Plastics and meteorites 158 (9)
Radiation damage in plastics 158 (3)
Meteorites 161 (6)
Gas-filled detectors - proportional 167 (5)
counters, Geiger counters and spark chambers
Solid state devices 172 (6)
Semiconductor devices 173 (1)
Scintillation detectors 174 (2)
Crystal detectors 176 (1)
Cherenkov detectors 177 (1)
Cosmic ray, X-ray, γ-ray and neutrino 178 (38)
telescopes
Introduction 178 (1)
Anticoincidence techniques and cosmic ray 178 (9)
telescopes
X-ray telescopes 187 (12)
The UHURU X-ray satellite 189 (2)
The Einstein X-ray Observatory 191 (5)
The Advanced X-ray Astronomy Facility 196 (3)
(AXAF) and other future X-ray missions
γ-ray telescopes 199 (11)
γ-ray telescopes at energies 200 (2)
&epsis; ≥ 30 MeV
Compton telescopes 202 (2)
The Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO) 204 (1)
Ultrahigh energy γ-ray telescopes 205 (5)
Neutrino telescopes 210 (6)
Detectors and telescopes for optical, 216 (54)
infrared, ultraviolet and radio astronomy
Introduction 216 (1)
Diffraction-limited telescopes 217 (11)
A pedagogical interlude 228 (2)
Interferometry and synthesis imaging 230 (7)
The sensitivities of astronomical detectors 237 (9)
Optical and infrared detectors 237 (7)
Radio and millimetre-wave receivers 244 (2)
Detectors 246 (14)
Optical and ultraviolet detectors 247 (6)
Infrared detectors 253 (3)
Radio and millimetre receivers 256 (4)
Two more great observatories 260 (5)
The Hubble Space Telescope 260 (4)
The Space Infrared Telescope Facility 264 (1)
(SIRTF)
Economic and political considerations 265 (5)
The cosmic ray flux at the top of the 270 (27)
atmosphere
The energy spectra of cosmic rays 270 (4)
The abundances of the elements in the 274 (10)
cosmic rays
The Solar System abundances of the 277 (2)
elements
The chemical abundances in the cosmic rays 279 (3)
Isotopic abundances of cosmic rays 282 (2)
The isotropy and energy density of the 284 (2)
cosmic rays
The highest energy cosmic rays and 286 (5)
extensive air-showers
Observations of the highest energy cosmic 291 (5)
rays
The problems to be solved 296 (1)
The Solar Wind and its influence upon the 297 (34)
local flux of cosmic rays
Introduction 297 (1)
The Solar Wind 297 (3)
Evidence for solar modulation 300 (4)
The electrical conductivity of a fully 304 (3)
ionised plasma
Flux freezing 307 (8)
The physical approach 308 (2)
The mathematical approach 310 (2)
Application to the Solar Wind 312 (3)
Shock waves 315 (5)
The basic properties of plane shock waves 316 (3)
The supersonic piston 319 (1)
The Earth's magnetosphere 320 (11)
Appendix The influence of the Earth's 325 (1)
magnetic field
Dynamics of charged particles in a dipole 325 (2)
magnetic field
Particle diagnostics using the Earth's 327 (4)
magnetic field
The dynamics of charged particles in magnetic 331 (26)
fields
A uniform static magnetic field 331 (2)
A time-varying magnetic field 333 (5)
Physical approach to the non-relativistic 333 (3)
case
Adiabatic invariant approach 336 (2)
The diffusion of high energy particles in 338 (8)
the interplanetary medium
The diffusion equation 339 (1)
Adiabatic deceleration of high energy 340 (4)
particles
Empirical convection-diffusion model for 344 (2)
solar modulation
Diffusion coefficients for high energy 346 (5)
particles scattered by magnetic
irregularities
The power spectrum of irregularities in 346 (3)
the Solar Wind
The diffusion coefficients for high 349 (2)
energy particles in the Solar Wind
High energy particles in the outer 351 (4)
heliosphere
Discussion 355 (2)
The high energy astrophysics of the Solar 357 (43)
System
Introduction - a word of caution 357 (1)
The atmosphere of the Sun and the solar 358 (5)
corona
Solar flares 363 (8)
Magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere 371 (11)
Magnetic flux freezing 371 (2)
Magnetic buoyancy 373 (1)
Neutral current sheets and the 374 (6)
reconnection of magnetic lines of force
Models for solar flares 380 (2)
High energy particles in solar flares 382 (11)
X and γ-ray studies of solar flares 382 (6)
Solar energetic particles 388 (5)
The acceleration of particles in solar 393 (3)
flares
DC electric field acceleration 393 (2)
Double layers 395 (1)
Other processes 396 (1)
Particle acceleration in other regions in 396 (2)
the Solar System
Conclusion 398 (2)
References 400 (9)
Index 409