Life in a Muslim Uzbek Village : Cotton Farming after Communism (Case Studies in Cultural Anthropology) (1ST)

Life in a Muslim Uzbek Village : Cotton Farming after Communism (Case Studies in Cultural Anthropology) (1ST)

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  • 製本 Paperback:紙装版/ペーパーバック版/ページ数 212 p.
  • 言語 ENG,ENG
  • 商品コード 9780495092810
  • DDC分類 320

Full Description


"Life in a Muslim Uzbek Villageaims to identify and explain aspects of Uzbek cultural life in a farming village on a 'kolkhoz' (collective farm) that account for both cultural patterns and culture change. This case study depicts the cultural changes and continuities that have occurred as a result of Uzbekistan's recent political independence from the Soviet Union. It describes, from the author's own experience and understanding of Uzbek rural life, how the production and global exportation of cotton has brought new challenges and opportunities to contemporary Uzbek citizens. Students will see how vital cotton is to the modern Uzbek way of life as a means through which the people generate the bulk of their country's wealth (and, as a result, their own autocratic society). In light of their changing environs, the people of Uzbekistan have been forced to negotiate a new identity and culture for themselves in relation to their country, their continent, and the rest of the world.

Table of Contents

Foreword                                           viii
Preface xii
Introduction xvi
Just Getting from Here to There in 1 (31)
Uzbekistan
Introduction 1 (1)
Encountering Central Asia in Queens, New 2 (1)
York
The Academic Path to Uzbekistan 3 (2)
From Moscow to Tashkent 5 (2)
Among Fellow Scholars at the Uzbekistan 7 (3)
Academy of Sciences
What Could Be So Bad About the 10 (1)
Countryside?
Getting Closer to the Village 11 (2)
The Road to the Kolkhoz 13 (2)
Village Economic Basics 15 (5)
Buying and Selling 20 (2)
When Does the Bus Come? 22 (2)
Kolkhoz Living Arrangements and Family 24 (2)
Households
The Demanding, Selfish State and Its 26 (4)
Relationship to the Kolkhoz
Conclusion 30 (1)
Questions 31 (1)
Historical Connections and Today's Kolkhoz 32 (32)
Reinterpreting the Soviet-Constructed 40 (6)
Past, Reflecting on Continuity
Paradoxes of Colonialist Observers: 46 (4)
Savages Ignoble and Noble Yesterday and
Today
Society and Land During the Kokand 50 (3)
Khanate: Pre-Russian Imperial Uzbek
Villages
Russian Imperial Approach to Landlessness 53 (2)
and Peasantry
Essential Aspects of Social Relations and 55 (3)
Structure Past and Present
Contesting History 58 (5)
Conclusion 63 (1)
Questions 63 (1)
The Kolkhoz as Plantation 64 (26)
Who Says You Can't Eat Cotton? Cotton in 64 (3)
Social Life
Speaking of Things Better Left Unsaid 67 (1)
The Mud Collective and Talk of Better Days 68 (2)
When We Say ``Pick,'' You Say ``How Much'' 70 (2)
Talk of ``Transition'' Undermined by 72 (5)
Communist Ethos
Women as Full-Time Cotton Peasants 77 (2)
Here We Are Now---Entertain Us 79 (1)
Made in India 79 (6)
New Year's Day (Navruz) 81 (1)
Independence Day 82 (2)
Weddings 84 (1)
Poverty, Cotton, and a Path to the Past? 85 (4)
Conclusion 89 (1)
Questions 89 (1)
Cuisine, Celebrations, and Ceremonies 90 (37)
Introduction 90 (2)
Osh Eimiz! (Let's Eat Pilaf!) 92 (4)
Mealtime Etiquette 96 (2)
The Importance of Feeling Full 98 (2)
Living by Bread Alone 100 (3)
Electrification (Sort of) and the People 103 (3)
Who Didn't Starve
Curtailing Excessive Weddings 106 (8)
The Value of a Daughter 114 (1)
Enacting Weddings and Traditional 115 (4)
Continuities
The ``Price'' of Hospitality 119 (2)
Otadan Mekhmon Iuquri (A Guest Is Higher 121 (2)
Than the Father)
The Tale of the Man on the Road: An Odd 123 (2)
Way of Relating to a Guest
Keeping Up Appearances 125 (1)
Conclusion 126 (1)
Questions 126 (1)
Running on Empty: Surviving on the Kolkhoz 127 (32)
The Bazaar as Microcosm of Post-Soviet 127 (4)
Life
The Marketplace Encounter as an Extension 131 (2)
of the Village and Its Social Relations
The Kiosks 133 (1)
Wishful Thinking About the Countryside 134 (1)
Doctors Becoming Peasants 135 (2)
Reconsidering Formal Education 137 (3)
This Is Not Farming! We're Not Farmers! 140 (2)
From Caretaker State to New Thinking on 142 (1)
Self-Reliance
Enduring Collectivism 143 (3)
State Administration of the Kolkhoz 146 (5)
The Mahalla Komitet (Neighborhood 151 (2)
Committee)
The Kolkhoznik as Consumer: Timor Emptor! 153 (3)
(May the Buyer Be Afraid!)
So Long, Agro-Welfare 156 (1)
Conclusion 157 (1)
Questions 158 (1)
Uzbekistan's Cotton, Home Economics, and 159 (27)
the Larger World
Domestic Serfdom: 160 (2)
Mother-in-Law/Daughter-in-Law Relations
Women Make the Best Cotton Pickers 162 (3)
The Cotton Picker's Day 165 (2)
Tarnished ``Gold'': Cotton Earnings and 167 (2)
the Individual
Insult to Injury 169 (7)
Affirming Village Identity: You Are What 176 (2)
You Wear
Identity and Plantation 178 (6)
Conclusion 184 (1)
Questions 185 (1)
Conclusion 186 (12)
Bibliography 198 (5)
Index 203