An Introduction to Family Social Work (2ND)

An Introduction to Family Social Work (2ND)

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  • 製本 Paperback:紙装版/ペーパーバック版/ページ数 393 p.
  • 言語 ENG,ENG
  • 商品コード 9780495092247
  • DDC分類 361

Table of Contents

PREFACE                                            xviii
CHAPTER ONE The Field of Family Social Work 1 (40)
What Is Family Social Work? 2 (4)
Field of Family Social Work 4 (2)
Family Social Work and Family Therapy 6 (1)
Realities of Family Social Work Practice 7 (2)
The Family as a Special Group Form 8 (1)
What Is a Family? 9 (2)
Purposes of Families 11 (3)
Diversity and Families 14 (3)
Family Diversity Now and Beyond 17 (2)
Family of Orientation/Family of Origin 18 (1)
Family of Procreation 18 (1)
Extended Family 18 (1)
Blended Family 19 (1)
Adoptive Family 19 (1)
Foster Family 19 (1)
Single-Parent Family 19 (1)
Diverse Family Structures 19 (1)
A Definition of Family 20 (2)
Myths About the Family 22 (1)
Beliefs About Families 22 (4)
Belief I: Families Want to Be Healthy 23 (1)
Belief II: Families Want to Stay Together 23 (1)
and Overcome Their Differences
Belief III: Parents Need Understanding and 24 (1)
Support for the Challenges Involved in
Keeping Relationships Satisfying and for
Raising Children
Belief IV: Parents Can Learn Positive, 24 (1)
Effective Ways of Responding to Their
Children if They Have Opportunities for
Support, Knowledge, and Skills
Belief V Parents' Basic Needs Must Be Met 24 (1)
Before They Can Respond Effectively and
Positively to the Needs of Their Children
Belief VI: Every Family Member Needs 24 (1)
Nurturing
Belief VII: Family Members, Regardless of 25 (1)
Gender or Age, Deserve Respect from Each
Other
Belief VIII: A Child's Emotional and 25 (1)
Behavioral Difficulties Should Be Viewed
Within the Context of the Family and the
Larger Social Environment
Belief IX: All People Need a Family 25 (1)
Belief X: Most Family Difficulties Do Not 25 (1)
Appear Overnight But Have Developed
Gradually Over the Years
Belief XI: A Difference Exists Between 25 (1)
Thoughts and Actions in Parenting
Belief XII: A Difference Exists Between 26 (1)
Being a "Perfect" Parent and a "Good
Enough" Parent
Belief XIII: Families Require Fair and 26 (1)
Equal Treatment from Environmental Systems
Principles That Guide Family Social Work 26 (2)
Principle I: The Best Place to Help 26 (1)
Families Is in Their Home
Principle II: Family Social Work Empowers 26 (1)
Families to Solve Their Own Problems
Principle III: Intervention Should Be 27 (1)
Individualized and Based Upon an Assessment
of the Social, Psychological, Cultural,
Educational, Economic, and Physical
Characteristics of the Particular Family
Principle IV Family Social Workers Must 27 (1)
Respond First to the Immediate Needs of
Families and Then to Their Long-Term Goals
Assumptions of Family Social Work 28 (7)
Home-Based Support for Families 28 (2)
Family-Centered Philosophy 30 (1)
Crisis Intervention 30 (1)
"Teachability" of Families 31 (1)
Ecological Approach 32 (3)
Chapter Summary 35 (1)
Exercises 36 (5)
CHAPTER TWO Family Systems 41 (32)
What Is a Family System? 42 (2)
Key Assumptions About Family Systems 44 (18)
The Family As a Whole Is More than the Sum 45 (1)
of Its Parts
Families Try to Balance Change and Stability 46 (4)
A Change in One Family Member Affects All 50 (1)
of the Family Members
Family Members' Behaviors Are Best 51 (4)
Explained by Circular Causality
A Family Belongs to a Larger Social System 55 (4)
and Encompasses Many Subsystems
A Family Operates According to Established 59 (3)
Rules
Family Subsystems 6i
Spousal and Parental Subsystems 62 (1)
Triangulation 62 (3)
The Sibling Subsystem: Fellow Travelers 65 (1)
Family System Disruptions 66 (2)
Multigenerational Transmission of Patterns 68 (1)
Chapter Summary 69 (1)
Exercises 69 (4)
CHAPTER THREE Practical Aspects of Family 73 (20)
Social Work
Referral Process 74 (1)
Scheduling Family Meetings 74 (3)
Setting Up the First Appointment 75 (1)
Allowing for Travel Time 75 (1)
Accommodating Family Preferences 76 (1)
Preparation and Care of Materials 77 (1)
What to Wear 78 (1)
Including Children in Meetings 78 (2)
Handling Disruptions and Maintaining Contact 80 (1)
Telephone Follow-Up 80 (1)
Safety Considerations 81 (3)
The Aggressive Parent 83 (1)
The First Meeting: Assessing Clients' Needs 84 (2)
Building a Relationship with Clients 86 (2)
Orienting Clients to Family Social Work 88 (1)
Case 3.1: Confidentiality 89 (1)
Protecting Clients' Confidentiality 89 (2)
Guidelines for Protecting Clients' 89 (2)
Confidentiality
Case 3.2: Preparing for the Beginning Visit 91 (1)
Chapter Summary 91 (1)
Exercises 92 (1)
CHAPTER FOUR The Beginning Phase 93 (26)
Tasks for the Beginning Phase: Engagement and 94 (6)
Assessment
Make Contact with Every Family Member 96 (1)
Define the Problem to Include Perceptions 96 (2)
of All Members of the Family
Establish Goals and Clarify an Intervention 98 (1)
Process
Case 4.1: Family Social Work Goals 99 (1)
Contract with the Family 99 (1)
Common Pitfalls of New FSWs 99 (1)
Basic Interviewing Skills Needed by Family 100 (1)
Social Workers
Guidelines for Effective Interviews 101 (2)
Principles of Effective Communication 103 (7)
The Communication Process 105 (1)
Influence of Cultural Background 106 (1)
Methods of Providing Information 107 (1)
Attending Behaviors 108 (1)
Self-Awareness 109 (1)
Core Qualities Needed by Family Social Workers 110 (6)
Empathy 110 (4)
Nonpossessive Warmth 114 (1)
Genuineness 115 (1)
Dysfunctional Behaviors to Avoid in Family 116 (1)
Social Work
Chapter Summary 117 (1)
Exercises 117 (2)
CHAPTER FIVE Qualitative Family Assessment 119 (37)
Introduction to Qualitative Assessment 120 (1)
Case 5.1: Family Assessment 121 (1)
The Context of Family Assessment 121 (2)
Purpose of Family Assessment 123 (1)
Ecological Assessment 123 (4)
Qualitative Techniques 127 (3)
Family History 128 (2)
Visual Techniques 130 (10)
Genogram 131 (6)
Ecomap 137 (2)
Other Visual Techniques 139 (1)
Criteria for Assessing Family Functioning 140 (1)
Family Assessment Measure 141 (4)
Problem Solving 141 (1)
Affective Responsiveness 142 (1)
Affective Involvement 142 (1)
Communication 142 (2)
Role Behavior 144 (1)
Autonomy 144 (1)
Modes of Behavioral Control 145 (1)
Assessing Parenting Skills 145 (2)
Assessment of Child Development 146 (1)
Assessment of Parent砲hild Relationship 147 (1)
Considerations for Assessing Minority Families 147 (6)
Assessment Issues for African American 148 (1)
Families
Assessment Issues for Hispanic American 148 (1)
Families
Assessment Issues for Asian American 148 (1)
Families
Assessment Issues for Native American 148 (1)
Families
Psychosocial Adjustment 149 (1)
Relationships with Family Members 149 (1)
School Adjustment and Achievement 150 (1)
Case 5.2: Ethnic Minorities 151 (1)
Peer Relationships 151 (1)
Adaptation to the Community 151 (1)
Case 5.3: Genogram 152 (1)
Chapter Summary 153 (1)
Exercises 153 (3)
CHAPTER SIX Quantitative Assessment 156 (22)
Purposes of Quantitative Measurement 157 (1)
Selecting a Measurement Instrument 157 (9)
Reliability 158 (4)
Validity 162 (4)
Frameworks for Incorporating Quantitative 166 (3)
Measurement
Single Subject Design 166 (3)
Goal Attainment Scaling 169 (1)
Measurement Instruments 169 (4)
Self-anchored and Self-Monitoring 169 (2)
Instruments
Direct Behavioral Observation 171 (2)
Standardized Measures 173 (1)
Other Quantified Measures 173 (1)
Using Measurement to Link Assessment and 173 (1)
Intervention
Client Readiness for Treatment 174 (1)
Treatment Planning 174 (1)
Case 6.1: Quantitative Assessment 175 (1)
Chapter Summary 175 (1)
Exercises 176 (2)
CHAPTER SEVEN Family Development and the Life 178 (42)
Cycle
Understanding a Developmental Perspective 178 (1)
Factors Affecting Family Diversity over the 179 (5)
Life Cycle
Culture 179 (1)
Social Class 180 (1)
Gender 181 (1)
Immigration 181 (1)
Sexual Orientation 182 (2)
Developmental Stages 184 (20)
Marriage/Partnering/Pair 188 (1)
Bonding/Affiliative Orientation
Case 7.1: Transition 189 (2)
Birth of the First Child and So On 191 (3)
Families with Preschool Children 194 (1)
Families with School-Aged Children 195 (3)
Families with Teenagers 198 (2)
Families with Young People Leaving Home: 200 (2)
Launching
Boomerang Phase 202 (1)
Issues for Older Parents 203 (1)
Variations Affecting the Family Life Cycle 204 (10)
Separation and Divorce 204 (5)
Single Parenting 209 (2)
Remarriage, Step parenting, and Blended 211 (2)
Families: How Many Times Do You Hear About
Ugly Step fathers?
Death of a Parent 213 (1)
Parenting by Grandparents 213 (1)
Case 7.2: Working with Diverse Family 214 (1)
Structures
Chapter Summary 214 (1)
Exercises 215 (5)
CHAPTER EIGHT Family Strengths and Resilience 220 (30)
Ecological Risk and Opportunities 221 (6)
Microsystem 221 (3)
Mesosystem 224 (2)
Exosystem 226 (1)
Macrosystem 226 (1)
Risk 227 (3)
Culture 230 (9)
Family Resilience 239 (3)
Strengths: Creating an Ecological Niche 242 (3)
Key Strategies 245 (3)
Case 8.1: Looking for Strengths 247 (1)
Chapter Summary 248 (1)
Exercises 248 (2)
CHAPTER NINE Assessment with the Entire Family 250 (22)
Effective Assessment and Intervention 251 (5)
Culturally Sensitive Practice 251 (1)
Focus on the Family's Needs 252 (1)
Respect Clients' Autonomy 253 (1)
Avoid Fostering Dependency 253 (1)
Reassess Clients' Resistance 254 (1)
Maintain Professional Distance 254 (1)
Set Reasonable Expectations 255 (1)
A Micro and Macro Focus: An Ecological 255 (1)
Intervention
Defining Problems 256 (3)
Circular Patterns 259 (3)
Stimulating Interaction 260 (1)
Lineal Circular, Strategic, and Reflexive 261 (1)
Questions
Intervention in Circular Maladaptive Patterns 262 (1)
Detriangulation 263 (1)
Working with Involuntary Clients 264 (3)
Goal Setting 267 (1)
Contracting 268 (1)
Case 9.7: Working with Other Helpers 269 (1)
Chapter Summary 269 (1)
Exercises 270 (2)
CHAPTER TEN The Intervention Phase 272 (29)
Intervention Phases 272 (2)
Roles and Objectives of the Family Social 274 (2)
Worker
Intervention Techniques 276 (8)
Observation 276 (3)
Focusing 279 (1)
Use of Examples 279 (1)
Confrontation 279 (3)
Re framing 282 (1)
Enactment 282 (1)
Externalizing the Problem 282 (1)
Use of Metaphor 283 (1)
Contracting 283 (1)
Ecologocial Intervention 284 (1)
Crisis Intervention 284 (1)
How to Teach Problem-Solving Skills 285 (2)
Developing Problem-Solving Skills 286 (1)
Solution-Focused Problem-Solving Questions 287 (1)
How to Teach Communication Skills 287 (2)
Listening and Empathizing 288 (1)
Use of "I" Statements 288 (1)
Working with Enmeshed or Disengaged Families 289 (2)
Establishing Boundaries 289 (1)
Dealing with Dysfunctional Family Alliances 290 (1)
Working with Family Rules 290 (1)
Guidelines for Intervention with Minority 291 (7)
Families
Intervention with African American Families 292 (1)
Intervention with Hispanic American Families 293 (1)
Intervention with Asian American Families 294 (1)
Intervention with Native American Families 294 (1)
Different Cultures Working Together 295 (3)
Case 10.1: Multigenerational Patterns 298 (1)
Chapter Summary 298 (1)
Exercises 299 (2)
CHAPTER ELEVEN Interventions at the Child and 301 (28)
Parental Levels
A Behavioral Family Approach 301 (14)
Assumptions 302 (1)
Principles and Procedures 303 (2)
Techniques 305 (9)
Evidence Base of Behavioral Family 314 (1)
Interventions
Parenting Skills Training 315 (7)
Assumptions 315 (1)
Principles and Procedures 316 (4)
Techniques 320 (1)
Case 11.1: Parent Training 321 (1)
Behavior Problems and Parent砲hild Conflict 322 (1)
Assisting Parents in Setting Rules 323 (1)
Avoiding Pitfalls in Behavioral Interventions 323 (1)
Family Psychoeducational Interventions 324 (3)
Assumptions 324 (1)
Principles and Procedures 325 (1)
Techniques 325 (1)
Evidence Base for Family Psychoeducation 325 (1)
Case 11.2: Psychoeducation 326 (1)
Case 11.3: Focusing on Children 326 (1)
Case 11.4: Incorporating Everyone's 327 (1)
Perspective
Chapter Summary 327 (1)
Exercises 327 (2)
CHAPTER TWELVE Interventions with Couples and 329 (21)
Gender Sensitive Intervention
Couple Work 330 (1)
Gender Sensitive Perspective 331 (1)
Gender Sensitive Intervention 332 (2)
Problem Solving Within a Gender Sensitive 334 (1)
Intervention Perspective
Historical Context 334 (1)
A Feminist Critique of Family Systems Theory 335 (2)
Power Imbalances in Family Relationships 337 (2)
The Ecological Orientation of Gender 339 (1)
Sensitive Practice
Family Values and Family Violence: A Critique 339 (3)
Family Privacy 340 (1)
Family Stability 340 (1)
Conjugal and Parental Rights 341 (1)
Socialization and Gender Roles 342 (1)
Division of Labor in Families 343 (1)
Recommendations for Gender Sensitive Family 344 (4)
Social Work
Intervention Steps 346 (1)
Case 12.1: Evaluating Marital Work 347 (1)
Chapter Summary 347 Exercises 348 (2)
CHAPTER THIRTEEN The Termination Phase 350 (18)
Planning for Termination 352 (1)
Possible Reactions to Termination 352 (2)
Premature Termination and Dropouts 354 (1)
Practical Termination Steps 355 (4)
Steps for Termination 359 (4)
Case 13.1: Termination 363 (1)
Timing of Termination 363 (1)
How and When to Refer Clients to Other 364 (1)
Professionals
Evaluating Results of Family Social Work 365 (2)
Case 13.2: Termination 366 (1)
Chapter Summary 367 (1)
Exercises 367 (1)
REFERENCES 368 (17)
NAME INDEX 385 (3)
SUBJECT INDEX 388