Consumer Behaviour : A European Perspective (2ND)

Consumer Behaviour : A European Perspective (2ND)

  • Ft Pr(2001/12発売)
  • ただいまウェブストアではご注文を受け付けておりません。 ⇒古書を探す
  • 製本 Paperback:紙装版/ペーパーバック版/ページ数 630 p.
  • 言語 ENG,ENG
  • 商品コード 9780273651826
  • DDC分類 658.8342094

Table of Contents

Preface                                            xiii
Part A CONSUMERS IN THE MARKETPLACE 1 (31)
An introduction to consumer behaviour 2 (30)
Part B CONSUMERS AS INDIVIDUALS 32 (200)
Perception and interpretation 34 (30)
Learning and memory 64 (28)
Motivation, values and involvement 92 (34)
Attitudes 126 (28)
Attitude change and interactive communications 154 (34)
The self 188 (44)
Case studies 1-3 221 (11)
Part C CONSUMERS AS DECISION-MAKERS 232 (112)
Individual decision-making 234 (34)
Shopping, buying, evaluating and disposing 268 (34)
Group influence and opinion leadership 302 (42)
Case studies 4-6 335 (9)
Part D A PORTRAIT OF EUROPEAN CONSUMERS 344 (94)
European family structure and household 346 (28)
decision-making
Income and social class 374 (30)
Age subcultures 404 (34)
Case studies 7-9 426 (12)
Part E CULTURE AND EUROPEAN LIFESTYLES 438 (144)
Culture and consumer behaviour 440 (30)
Cultural change processes 470 (32)
Lifestyles and European cultures 502 (38)
New times, new consumers 540 (42)
Case studies 10-12 569 (13)
Glossary 582 (9)
Indexes 591

027365187.TOC0273651870



Preface xiii

Publisher's acknowledgements xix

PART A Business and economics

Chapter 1 The business environment and business 3 (14)

economics

1.1 The business environment 4 (2)

1.2 The structure of industry 6 (8)

1.3 The determinants of business performance 14

Box 1.1 The UK defence industry 6 (11)

Chapter 2 Economics and the world of business 17 (22)

2.1 What do economists study? 17 (2)

2.2 Business economics: the macroeconomic 19 (4)

environment

2.3 Business economics: microeconomic choices 23 (4)

Appendix: Some techniques of economic analysis 27

Box 2.1 Looking at macroeconomic data 21 (3)

Box 2.2 The opportunity costs of studying 24 (6)

economics

Box 2.3 Representation of data 30 (9)

Chapter 3 Business organisations 39 (15)

3.1 The nature of firms 39 (4)

3.2 The firm as a legal entity 43 (4)

3.3 The internal organisation of the firm 47

Box 3.1 Managers and owners 44 (6)

Box 3.2 Downsizing and business reorganisation 50 (4)

Chapter 4 The working of competitive markets 54 (20)

4.1 Business in a competitive market 54 (3)

4.2 Demand 57 (4)

4.3 Supply 61 (4)

4.4 Price and output determination 65 (1)

Box 4.1 UK house prices 66 (4)

Box 4.2 The heyday of the auction 70 (4)

Chapter 5 Business in a market environment 74 (29)

5.1 Price elasticity of demand 74 (4)

5.2 The importance of price elasticity of 78 (3)

demand to business decision making

5.3 Other elasticities 81 (5)

5.4 The time dimension of market adjustment 86 (8)

5.5 Dealing with uncertainty 94

Box 5.1 The market for leather 85 (5)

Box 5.2 Adjusting to oil price shocks 90 (5)

Box 5.3 The role of the speculator 95 (8)

PART B Background to demand

Chapter 6 Demand and the consumer 103 (23)

6.1 Marginal utility theory 103 (6)

6.2 Demand under conditions of risk and 109 (4)

uncertainty

6.3 The characteristics approach to analysing 113

consumer demand

Box 6.1 The marginal utility revolution: 108 (4)

Jevons, Menger, Walras

Box 6.2 Problems for unwary insurance 112 (14)

companies

Chapter 7 Demand and the firm 126 (14)

7.1 Estimating demand functions 126 (6)

7.2 Forecasting demand 132

Box 7.1 The demand for butter 129 (11)

Chapter 8 Products, marketing and advertising 140 (23)

8.1 Product differentiation 140 (4)

8.2 Marketing the product 144 (3)

8.3 Advertising 147

Box 8.1 Brands and own-brands 142 (12)

Box 8.2 Advertising and the long run 154 (9)

PART C Background to supply

Chapter 9 Costs of production 163 (31)

9.1 The meaning of costs 163 (2)

9.2 Production in the short run 165 (6)

9.3 Costs in the short run 171 (6)

9.4 Production in the long run 177 (7)

9.5 Costs in the long run 184

Box 9.1 The fallacy of using historic costs 164 (3)

Box 9.2 Followers of fashion 167 (9)

Box 9.3 Short-run cost curves in practice 176 (4)

Box 9.4 Liverpool: the home of the Beatles 180 (8)

and computer games!

Box 9.5 Minimum efficient scale 188 (6)

Chapter 10 Revenue and profit 194 (17)

10.1 Revenue 194 (5)

10.2 Profit maximisation 199 (12)

PART D Supply: short-run profit maximisation

Chapter 11 Profit maximisation under perfect 211 (20)

competition and monopoly

11.1 Alternative market structures 211 (1)

11.2 Perfect competition 212 (8)

11.3 Monopoly 220 (4)

11.4 Potential competition or potential 224

monopoly? The theory of contestable markets

Box 11.1 Concentration ratios 213 (5)

Box 11.2 E-commerce 218 (8)

Box 11.3 Windows cleaning 226 (5)

Chapter 12 Profit maximisation under imperfect 231 (22)

competition

12.1 Monopolistic competition 231 (5)

12.2 Oligopoly 236

Box 12.1 Curry wars 235 (11)

Box 12.2 Rip-off Britain 246 (7)

PART E Supply: alternative strategies

Chapter 13 Alternative theories of the firm 253 (14)

13.1 Problems with traditional theory 253 (2)

13.2 Alternative maximising theories 255 (6)

13.3 Multiple aims 261

Box 13.1 In search of long-run profits 256 (6)

Box 13.2 Stakeholder power? 262 (5)

Chapter 14 Growth strategy 267 (20)

14.1 Growth and profitability 267 (1)

14.2 Constraints on growth 268 (3)

14.3 Alternative growth strategies 271 (1)

14.4 Growth through vertical integration 272 (4)

14.5 Growth through diversification 276 (1)

14.6 Growth through merger 277 (5)

14.7 Growth through strategic alliance 282

Box 14.1 'Panutilities' 277 (3)

Box 14.2 Merger activity 280 (4)

Box 14.3 The global information economy and 284 (3)

strategic alliances

Chapter 15 The small-firm sector 287 (16)

15.1 Defining the small-firm sector 287 (5)

15.2 The survival, growth and failure of 292 (6)

small businesses

15.3 Government assistance and the small firm 298

Box 15.1 The Dyson Dual Cyclone vacuum cleaner 293 (3)

Box 15.2 Hypergrowth companies 296 (7)

Chapter 16 Pricing strategy 303 (22)

16.1 Pricing and market structure 304 (2)

16.2 Alternative pricing strategies 306 (6)

16.3 Price discrimination 312 (4)

16.4 Multiple product pricing 316 (2)

16.5 Transfer pricing 318 (1)

16.6 Pricing and the product life cycle 318

Box 16.1 Predatory pricing in the airline 305 (5)

industry

Box 16.2 How do UK companies set prices? 310 (15)

PART F The firm in the factor market

Chapter 17 Labour markets, wages and industrial 325 (31)

relations

17.1 The UK labour market 325 (2)

17.2 Market-determined wage rates and 327 (8)

employment

17.3 Firms with power in the labour market 335 (1)

17.4 The role of trade unions 336 (5)

17.5 The efficiency wage hypothesis 341 (1)

17.6 Low pay and discrimination 342 (8)

17.7 The flexible firm and the market for 350

labour

Box 17.1 'Telecommuters' 328 (18)

Box 17.2 The UK national minimum wage 346 (6)

Box 17.3 The Internet and labour mobility 352 (4)

Chapter 18 Investment and the employment of 356 (27)

capital

18.1 The pricing of capital and capital 356 (2)

services

18.2 The demand for and supply of capital 358 (3)

services

18.3 Investment appraisal 361 (6)

18.4 Financing investment 367 (7)

18.5 The stock market 374

Box 18.1 Investing in roads 362 (8)

Box 18.2 Financing innovation 370 (13)

PART G The relationship between government and

business

Chapter 19 Reason for government intervention 383 (17)

in the market

19.1 Markets and the role of government 383 (1)

19.2 Types of market failure 384 (7)

19.3 Government intervention in the market 391 (6)

19.4 The case for laissez-faire 397 (1)

19.5 Firms and social responsibility 398

Box 19.1 Can the market provide adequate 388 (5)

protection for the environment?

Box 19.2 Deadweight loss from taxes on goods 393 (9)

and services

Box 19.3 The Body Shop 402

Chapter 20 Government and the firm 400 (27)

20.1 Policies towards monopolies and 406 (9)

oligopolies

20.2 Policies towards research and technology 415 (4)

development (R & TD)

20.3 Policies towards training 419

Box 20.1 Cartels set in concrete, steel and 414 (6)

cardboard

Box 20.2 The R & D scoreboard 420 (3)

Box 20.3 The costs of having a skills shortage 423 (4)

Chapter 21 Government and the market 427 (32)

21.1 Environmental policy 427 (8)

21.2 Transport policy 435 (9)

21.3 Privatisation and regulation 444

Box 21.1 Environmental auditing 429 (13)

Box 21.2 Road pricing in Singapore 442 (6)

Box 21.3 The right track to reform? 448 (11)

PART H Business in the international environment

Chapter 22 International trade 459 (22)

22.1 Trading patterns 459 (4)

22.2 The advantages of trade 463 (3)

22.3 Arguments for restricting trade 466 (5)

22.4 World attitudes towards trade and 471 (1)

protection

Box 22.1 Strategic trade theory 472 (2)

Box 22.2 The World Trade Organisation and its 474 (2)

future

Box 22.3 The battle of Seattle 476 (5)

Chapter 23 Multinational corporations 481 (19)

23.1 What is a multinational corporation? 481 (2)

23.2 Multinational corporations and the UK 483 (2)

economy

23.3 Why do businesses go multinational? 485 (5)

23.4 The advantages of MNC investment for the 490 (3)

host state

23.5 The disadvantages of MNC investment for 493 (1)

the host state

23.6 Multinational corporations and 494

developing economies

Box 23.1 Investing in Wales 490 (7)

Box 23.2 The Maharaja Mac 497 (3)

Chapter 24 Trading blocs

24.1 Preferential trading 500 (1)

24.2 Preferential trading in practice 500 (3)

24.3 The European Union 503 (5)

Box 24.1 Crisis in south-east Asia 508 (2)

Box 24.2 Beyond bananas 510 (9)

PART I The macroeconomic environment

Chapter 25 The macroeconomic environment of 519 (35)

business

25.1 Macroeconomic objectives 519 (1)

25.2 Economic growth 520 (7)

25.3 Unemployment 527 (6)

25.4 Inflation 533 (7)

25.5 The business cycle and macroeconomic 540 (1)

objectives

25.6 The circular flow of income 541 (6)

Appendix: Measuring national income and output 547

Box 25.1 Output gaps 522 (13)

Box 25.2 Is inflation dead? 535 (4)

Box 25.3 Disinflation in Europe and Japan 539 (15)

Chapter 26 The balance of payments and exchange 554 (21)

rates

26.1 The balance of payments account 554 (4)

26.2 The exchange rate 558 (4)

26.3 Exchange rates and the balance of 562 (3)

payments

26.4 Fixed versus floating exchange rates 565

Box 26.1 Dealing in foreign exchange 561 (1)

Box 26.2 Dunlop gives Britain the boot 562 (8)

Box 26.3 Currency turmoil 570 (5)

Chapter 27 Money and interest rates 575 (23)

27.1 The meaning and functions of money 575 (3)

27.2 The financial system in the UK 578 (8)

27.3 The supply of money 586 (5)

27.4 The demand for money 591 (2)

27.5 Equilibrium 593

Box 27.1 From building society to bank 577 (4)

Box 27.2 Are the days of cash numbered? 581 (8)

Box 27.3 UK monetary aggregates 589 (9)

Chapter 28 Economic ideas - Keynesian and 598 (35)

monetarist explanations of business activity

28.1 Background to the debate 598 (4)

28.2 The Keynesian theory of national income 602 (7)

determination

28.3 Keynesian analysis of cyclical 609 (4)

fluctuations in unemployment and inflation

28.4 The role of money in Keynesian and 613 (4)

monetarist models

28.5 Expectations and the Phillips curve 617 (8)

28.6 Common ground between economists 625

Box 28.1 Business expectations and their 610 (10)

effect on investment

Box 28.2 The political business cycle 620 (13)

PART J Macroeconomic policy

Chapter 29 Demand-side policy 633 (30)

29.1 Fiscal policy 633 (2)

29.2 The effectiveness of fiscal policy 635 (6)

29.3 Monetary policy 641 (4)

29.4 The effectiveness of monetary policy 645 (5)

29.5 Trends in public expenditure and the 650 (4)

crowding-out debate

29.6 The management of aggregate demand in 654

practice

Box 29.1 Following the golden rule 638 (5)

Box 29.2 The daily operation of monetary 643 (3)

policy

Box 29.3 Monetary policy in the eurozone 646 (3)

Box 29.4 Should central banks be independent 649 (14)

of government?

Chapter 30 Supply-side policy 663 (22)

30.1 The supply-side problem 663 (1)

30.2 Market-orientated supply-side policies 664 (6)

30.3 Regional and urban policy in the UK and 670 (8)

Europe

30.4 Industrial policy in the UK and Europe 678

Box 30.1 Private Finance Initiative (PFI) 668 (13)

projects

Box 30.2 A new approach to industrial policy 681 (4)

Chapter 31 International economic policy 685 (18)

31.1 International business cycles 685 (1)

31.2 International harmonisation of economic 686 (3)

policies

31.3 European economic and monetary union 689 (7)

31.4 Alternative policies for achieving 696

currency stability

Box 31.1 Monitoring the world economy 689 (6)

Box 31.2 Optimal currency areas 695 (8)

Web appendix 703 (6)

Index 709