Marginal Gains : Monetary Transactions in Atlantic Africa (The Lewis Henry Morgan Lecture Series)

個数:

Marginal Gains : Monetary Transactions in Atlantic Africa (The Lewis Henry Morgan Lecture Series)

  • 提携先の海外書籍取次会社に在庫がございます。通常3週間で発送いたします。
    重要ご説明事項
    1. 納期遅延や、ご入手不能となる場合が若干ございます。
    2. 複数冊ご注文の場合、分割発送となる場合がございます。
    3. 美品のご指定は承りかねます。

  • 提携先の海外書籍取次会社に在庫がございます。通常約2週間で発送いたします。
    重要ご説明事項
    1. 納期遅延や、ご入手不能となる場合が若干ございます。
    2. 複数冊ご注文の場合、分割発送となる場合がございます。
    3. 美品のご指定は承りかねます。
  • 【重要:入荷遅延について】
    ウクライナ情勢悪化・新型コロナウィルス感染拡大により、洋書・洋古書の入荷が不安定になっています。詳しくはこちらをご確認ください。
    海外からのお取り寄せの場合、弊社サイト内で表示している標準的な納期よりもお届けまでに日数がかかる見込みでございます。
    申し訳ございませんが、あらかじめご了承くださいますようお願い申し上げます。
  • ◆画像の表紙や帯等は実物とは異なる場合があります。
  • 製本 Paperback:紙装版/ペーパーバック版/ページ数 232 p.
  • 言語 ENG
  • 商品コード 9780226311166
  • DDC分類 332.4967

基本説明

Shows how culture actually works in daily practice, and reveals how popular economic systems work in Africa.

Full Description

In America, almost all the money in circulation passes through financial institutions every day. But in Nigeria's "cash and carry" system, 90 percent of the currency never comes back to a bank after it's issued. What happens when two such radically different economies meet and mingle, as they have for centuries in Atlantic Africa?

The answer is a rich diversity of economic practices responsive to both local and global circumstances. In Marginal Gains, Jane I. Guyer explores and explains these often bewildering practices, including trade with coastal capitalism and across indigenous currency zones, and within the modern popular economy. Drawing on a wide range of evidence, Guyer demonstrates that the region shares a coherent, if loosely knit, commercial culture. She shows how that culture actually works in daily practice, addressing both its differing scales of value and the many settings in which it operates, from crisis conditions to ordinary household budgets. The result is a landmark study that reveals not just how popular economic systems work in Africa, but possibly elsewhere in the Third World.