Friends in Life and Death: the British and Irish Quakers in the Demographic Transition, 1650-1900 (1st Edition)

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Friends in Life and Death: the British and Irish Quakers in the Demographic Transition, 1650-1900 (1st Edition)

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  • 製本 Hardcover:ハードカバー版
  • 商品コード 9780521392013
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基本説明

Book

"In Friends in life and death two distinguished historians join forces to exploit the exceptional riches offered by the records of British and Irish Quakers for the student of social, demographic, and familial change during the period 1650-1900. The authors have analyzed the experiences of more than 8, 000 Quaker families, involving over 30, 000 individuals, to produce an unparalleled study of patterns of child-bearing, marriage, and death among a major religious grouping. Professors Vann and Eversley show how Quaker values, both religious and economic, delayed marriage. The evidence suggests that in the seventeenth century some English Quakers practiced family limitation. English Quaker fertility, though rising to a peak from 1775 to 1825, was always lower than that of the Irish Quakers, who became one of the most fertile populations known to historical demographers. The mortality rate was high among urban Quakers prior to 1750, but better sanitation seems to have improved this. From 1825 onwards the number of births steadily declined, showing Quakers to have been in the vanguard of the move towards the small, modern family. The authors, wherever possible, compare the Quakers in the British Isles with the contemporary population of Britain and Ireland as a whole, as well as with that of France, Quebec, and the American colonies. Friends in life and death will thus make a contribution to our understanding of the social and economic history not only of this prominent British cultural group, but also that of other societies. " (Publisher)